Monthly Archives: August 2010

Posted in Behind the Scenes, Education, Getty Villa

Career Profile: Erin Branham, Education Specialist

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What is your job at the Getty? I’m an education specialist for family programs. Since I came to the Getty Villa in 2008, I’ve been building programs that appeal to parents and kids. There’s also a healthy new education section… More»

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Posted in Exhibitions and Installations, Paintings

Thumbs Up or Thumbs Down? Looking at Gérôme’s “Pollice Verso”

Pollice Verso: Detail of vestal virgins in the stands / Gerome

Visitors are captivated by The Spectacular Art of Jean-Léon Gérôme.  I met a couple from Miami who were so intrigued by a review of the exhibition in The Art Newspaper that they decided to fly to L.A. to see it. … More»

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Posted in Getty Villa

Life After Disaster: A Conversation with Archaeologist Sandy MacGillivray

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Canadian archaeologist Alexander “Sandy” MacGillivray studies disasters for a living. He’s an expert on one of the worst cataclysms in history, the eruption of the volcano on Thera (present-day Santorini, Greece) around 1500 B.C. Thera blackened the world’s skies, sent… More»

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Posted in Education, Getty Center, J. Paul Getty Museum

Once, Twice, Three Times! Students Make the Museum Their Own

Students from Palms Elementary in the photography galleries at the Getty Center

Palms Elementary was our partner this year for Art Together, a pilot program that invited students to explore the Museum in depth over multiple visits. We invited Mrs. Millenbaugh’s fourth-grade class at Palms to come the Museum three times. Why… More»

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      ROSE

      This milky pink boomed into popularity because of a marketing ploy, a mistress, and its ambiguous origins.

      In an effort to compete with the renowned Meissen porcelain factory, the French Sèvres manufactory recruited the glamorous Madame de Pompadour (mistress to King Louis XV). Like a smart sponsorship deal, Sèvres gave her all the porcelain she requested. 

      Introduced in 1757, this rich pink exploded on the scene thanks to favoritism by Madame Pompadour herself. 

      The glaze itself had a weird history. To the Europeans it looked Chinese, and to the Chinese it was European. It was made based on a secret 17th-century glassmaker’s technique, involving mixing glass with flecks of gold.

      For more on colors and their often surprising histories, check out The Brilliant History of Color in Art.

      12/19/14

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