Monthly Archives: October 2010

Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Research Institute

The 5th Annual Archives Bazaar

The 5th Annual Archives Bazaar was held at the Doheny Memorial Library at USC. Photo: Michael Castro

On Saturday, October 23, the Getty Research Institute participated in the 5th Annual Archives Bazaar. Organized by L.A. as Subject, a USC-hosted research alliance dedicated to improving the visibility, access, and prese­rvation of primary sources of Los Angeles history, the… More»

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Posted in Art, Education, J. Paul Getty Museum, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

Question of the Week: Fake vs. Real—Does It Matter?

Cabinet, French, 1580 - details of the wood carving and metal ornaments

Question of the Week is a series inspired by our Masterpiece of the Week tours, offered daily at 4:00 p.m. Featuring an open and upbeat discussion among visitors and gallery teachers, the tours feature a new object and pose a… More»

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Posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

Get the Scoop on Spooky Art for Halloween

She'll turn you to stone: Medusa, Vincenzo Gemito, parcel-gilt silver, 1911

What’s spookier than a terrible monster with snakes growing out of her head who can turn you to stone with just one look? Maybe it’s an invisible ghost who returns from the dead to haunt his wife. Or a sea… More»

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Posted in Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Seven Documentaries Inspired by Photojournalism

Kids + money: Megan, 11, and Ashley, 13, at their Calabasas home. Photograph by Lauren Greenfield/ INSTITUTE

“Witnesses in Action,” the documentary film series I curated earlier this month, followed the lenses of brave and talented photographers who took their cameras to far-flung locales. We started in mile-long factories in China, travelled to bizarre beached shipwrecks in… More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Foundation, Getty Research Institute

Innovating Art History from Brazil to L.A. and Back

Eliana de Azevedo Marques (center) looks at materials from the Research Library with me and Wim de Wit, head of the Department of Architecture & Contemporary Art

Last week the Getty Research Institute hosted a visitor from Brazil, Eliana de Azevedo Marques. She is chief librarian at the Faculty of Architecture and Urbanism at the University of São Paulo. We gave her a tour of our architectural… More»

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Posted in Getty Center, J. Paul Getty Museum

Did You Dance? Saturdays Off the 405 Season Finale Plus Bonus Playlist!

Tina (foreground) on bass in gold and pigtails, with vocalists, and Chris on drums in the background

We really turned it up this year at Saturdays Off the 405 with an eclectic mix of the best and brightest new music—including a season finale on October 9 with New Wave favorite the Tom Tom Club, doing totally live… More»

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Posted in Art, Education, J. Paul Getty Museum, Paintings

The Language of Drapery

Joseph and Potiphar's Wife (detail), Guido Reni, about 1630

Drapery—artfully folded fabric—has been used by European artists for centuries, from ancient Greek sculpture to contemporary photography. As I prepare for the studio course I’m leading this Wednesday on sketching drapery after the Old Masters, I’ve been thinking about why…. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Center, J. Paul Getty Museum, Paintings

A Curator Undercover at the Museum Info Desk

Hans Hoffmann's A Hare in the Forest is curved because its wooden support has warped with time.

As the Getty Museum’s senior curator of paintings, I feel it is incumbent on me to walk through the galleries almost every day, speaking with the security officers and other staff and watching how the public looks at the collections…. More»

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Posted in Getty Center, J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Friday Night: Susan Meiselas Discusses Her Work at the Getty Center

Traditional Indian dance mask adopted by the rebels during the fight against Somoza, Nicaragua, Susan Meiselas, negative 1978; print 1980s © Susan Meiselas / Magnum Photos
Photographer Susan Meiselas appears at the Getty Center this Friday evening to talk about her work and screen her 1991 film Pictures from a Revolution. Joining her to discuss the depiction of Latin America is Miguel Tinker Salas, professor of... More»
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Posted in Conservation, Getty Conservation Institute, Photographs, Film, and Video

Photographic History Smells Oh So Sweet

Le Cardinal d'Amboise, Joseph Nicéphore Niépce, (1765–1833), about 1826. Heliograph on pewter. The Royal Photographic Society Collection at National Media Museum
I’m always amazed when science can provide a new glimpse into the life and works of an artist who lived long before my time. It makes me feel closer to the artist’s intention to be able to understand how he or... More»
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      It’s been 125 years since Van Gogh’s death, today we celebrate his life’s work.


      5 Ways to See Van Gogh’s Irises

      Through observations, visitor conversations, and some sneaky eavesdropping, we’ve compiled the top 5 ways people enjoy this painting.

      1. In a Crowd
        One of the most obvious ways that people see the painting is in a crowd. The gallery is almost always filled, and you might have to wait before you can get up close. The anticipation builds as you start in the back row, and slowly move until you are close enough to see the brushstrokes of Van Gogh’s thick paint.

      2. Online
        David from Colorado said that this was his first visit, but he had already seen the painting online. In addition to being available through the Getty’s Open Content program, the painting is often seen on social media. Just search #irises on Instagram for a taste of the painting’s popularity. 

      3. Alone
        If you arrive right at 10 a.m. when the museum opens, the quiet gallery provides a perfect backdrop to really examine the painting. Solitude and seclusion gives the gallery a sense of intimacy. 

      4. Multiple Times
        Repeat visits can give rise to multiple interpretations. Is it a melancholy or joyous painting? Expressive or depressive? 

      5. Internationally
        Visitors from all across the world viewed this famous Van Gogh. In just one hour you can hear multiple languages—French, Italian, Chinese, Korean, German, and more. Irises seems to rise above cultural boundaries—a Dutch painting inspired by Japanese ukiyo-e prints—to strike an emotional resonance amongst all viewers. 

      What is your favorite lens to view Van Gogh’s work through? 

      07/29/15

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