Monthly Archives: December 2010

Posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, Education, Getty Villa, J. Paul Getty Museum

L.A. Teachers Explore Greek Vases in the Collections Store Room at the Getty Villa

David Saunders speaks with a group of students from UCLA. Most storeroom visits are reserved for college groups.
David Saunders speaks with a group of students from UCLA. Most storeroom visits are reserved for college groups.

Eleven teachers enter an underground room at the Getty Villa. In a space with wooden crates marked “fragile” sits a large table. They are asked to put on latex gloves as an aura of anticipation fills the air. “When was… More»

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Posted in Art, Getty Research Institute

Treasures from the Vault: Italian Artists’ Books

Books by Maurizio Nannucci. Top: Medium is word, 1975. Keleidoscope in a wooden box with a sliding top, 32 x 8 cm. Bottom: Museum of Modern Art, no. 15/30, 1983. Keychain inside a wooden box featuring a floor plan for a "Museum of Modern Art.” 7.3 x 10.8 cm. The Getty Research Institute, 890164, box 201 © Maurizio Nannucci
Books by Maurizio Nannucci. Top: Medium is word, 1975. Keleidoscope in a wooden box with a sliding top, 32 x 8 cm. Bottom: Museum of Modern Art, no. 15/30, 1983. Keychain inside a wooden box featuring a floor plan for a "Museum of Modern Art.” 7.3 x 10.8 cm. The Getty Research Institute, 890164, box 201 © Maurizio Nannucci
Saturday is the final day for the Santa Monica Museum of Art’s exhibition Libro/Oggetto: Italian Artists’ Books, 1960s–Now, a look at Italian artists’ books from the main art movements and trends of the second half of the 20th century. It... More»
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Posted in Art, Education, J. Paul Getty Museum, Paintings

Question of the Week: Does Art Have to Be Serious?

Self-Portrait, Yawning, Joseph Ducreux, before 1783. Oil on canvas, 45 x 35 in.
Nowadays, seeing a silly picture of a person is hardly unusual. Showing personality is a good thing. Social customs weren’t quite the same in 18th-century France, when Joseph Ducreux painted this self-portrait. An official court painter, he was known for refined... More»
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Posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum

Day Without Art: Reflecting on Art, Fragility, and Loss

Gravestone of Sime, Greek, about 320 B.C.
The frailty of the human condition—and the cruelty of untimely loss of life—is one of art's oldest and most enduring themes. Every year on December 1, we've reflected on this theme for Day Without Art, an international day of observance... More»
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      ROSE

      This milky pink boomed into popularity because of a marketing ploy, a mistress, and its ambiguous origins.

      In an effort to compete with the renowned Meissen porcelain factory, the French Sèvres manufactory recruited the glamorous Madame de Pompadour (mistress to King Louis XV). Like a smart sponsorship deal, Sèvres gave her all the porcelain she requested. 

      Introduced in 1757, this rich pink exploded on the scene thanks to favoritism by Madame Pompadour herself. 

      The glaze itself had a weird history. To the Europeans it looked Chinese, and to the Chinese it was European. It was made based on a secret 17th-century glassmaker’s technique, involving mixing glass with flecks of gold.

      For more on colors and their often surprising histories, check out The Brilliant History of Color in Art.

      12/19/14

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