Monthly Archives: July 2011

Posted in Architecture and Design, Art, Getty Research Institute

Happy 100th Birthday, John Lautner!

John Lautner, 1970. © J. Paul Getty Trust. Used with permission. Julius Shulman Photography Archive, Research Library at the Getty Research Institute, 2004.R.10

The Los Angeles City Council will vote Friday to declare July 16th “John Lautner Day.” This Saturday would have been the 100th birthday of John Lautner (1911–1994), who is considered one of the most visionary architects of the 20th century,… More»

Tagged , , , , , , , , 6 Responses
Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Foundation, Philanthropy

Exploring Multidimensional Practice at Arts Summit

Participants in the Getty Foundation's Multicultural Undergraduate Internship (MUI) program attend a session at the 2011 Arts Summit

On June 27, 119 students participating in the Getty Foundation’s Multicultural Undergraduate Internship program came to the Getty Center for the program’s annual Arts Summit. Interns chose from discussion topics led by arts professionals who shared their personal experience and… More»

Tagged , , , , , , , Leave a comment
Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Research Institute

A Gallery Fit for a Prince and Now the Public? The Düsseldorf Gallery and the Modern Museum

View of a Room at Pommersfelden Palace. Johann Georg Pintz, printmaker; Salomon Kleiner, draftsman; in Representation au naturel des chateaux... (Augsburg, 1728), pl. 18. The Getty Research Institute,84-B21917

Most museum galleries have certain things in common. For one, the works are spaced a restful distance apart from one another on the wall. For another, they’re typically organized by school or theme. The focus might be, say, on fashion… More»

Tagged , , , , , 5 Responses
Posted in Behind the Scenes, Education, J. Paul Getty Museum

“Art Is Life. So to Learn It, You Engage with Life”: Mark Bradford on Teaching

A student and her self-portrait sculpture in coated wire
A student and her self-portrait sculpture in coated wire

Artist Mark Bradford recently visited one of Kristine Hatanaka’s art classes at Culver City High School to talk to students about works they’d created based on his art-making activity RE-RE-Process, available through Open Studio. Initiated by Mark as part of… More»

Tagged , , , , , 2 Responses
Posted in Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum

Play the Paris Gallery Game!

Find the six things that are different in this portrait of Gabriel Bernard de Rieux created by Maurice-Quentin de La Tour about 1739–41

The exhibition Paris: Life & Luxury transports you to an affluent Parisian home in the mid-1700s. It’s presented in a series of rooms that show the activities an elite family would have performed in the morning, afternoon, and evening—from dressing… More»

Tagged , , , , Leave a comment
Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Prints and Drawings

The Drawing That Once Hung in Thomas Jefferson’s Parlor

The Fright of Astyanax (Hector Bidding Farewell to Andromache), Benjamin West, 1797. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 84.GG.722
The Fright of Astyanax (Hector Bidding Farewell to Andromache), Benjamin West, 1797. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 84.GG.722

An American has slipped his way into exclusive British company—the exhibition Luminous Paper: British Watercolors and Drawings, opening July 19. Owned for years by Thomas Jefferson, admirer of all things classical, this pen-and-ink by Pennsylvania-born artist Benjamin West depicts a… More»

Tagged , , , , , , , Leave a comment
  • Facebook

  • Twitter

  • Tumblr

    • photo from Tumblr

      Olympian Census #4: Aphrodite

      Get the stats on your favorite (and not-so-favorite) gods and goddesses on view at the Getty Center.

      Roman name: Venus

      Employment: Goddess of Love and Beauty

      Place of residence: Mount Olympus

      Parents: Born out of sea foam formed when Uranus’s castrated genitals were thrown into the ocean

      Marital status: Married to Hephaestus, the God of Blacksmiths, but had many lovers, both immortal and mortal

      Offspring: Aeneas, Cupid, Eros, Harmonia, Hermaphroditos, and more

      Symbol: Dove, swan, and roses

      Special talent: Being beautiful and sexy could never have been easier for this Greek goddess

      Highlights reel:

      • Zeus knew she was trouble when she walked in (Sorry, Taylor Swift) to Mount Olympus for the first time. So Zeus married Aphrodite to his son Hephaestus (Vulcan), forming the perfect “Beauty and the Beast” couple.
      • When Aphrodite and Persephone, the queen of the underworld, both fell in love with the beautiful mortal boy Adonis, Zeus gave Adonis the choice to live with one goddess for 1/3 of the year and the other for 2/3. Adonis chose to live with Aphrodite longer, only to die young.
      • Aphrodite offered Helen, the most beautiful mortal woman, to Paris, a Trojan prince, to win the Golden Apple from him over Hera and Athena. She just conveniently forgot the fact that Helen was already married. Oops. Hello, Trojan War!

      Olympian Census is a 12-part series profiling gods in art at the Getty Center.

      08/03/15

  • Flickr