Monthly Archives: July 2011

Posted in Architecture and Design, Art, Getty Research Institute

Happy 100th Birthday, John Lautner!

John Lautner, 1970. © J. Paul Getty Trust. Used with permission. Julius Shulman Photography Archive, Research Library at the Getty Research Institute, 2004.R.10

The Los Angeles City Council will vote Friday to declare July 16th “John Lautner Day.” This Saturday would have been the 100th birthday of John Lautner (1911–1994), who is considered one of the most visionary architects of the 20th century,… More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Foundation, Philanthropy

Exploring Multidimensional Practice at Arts Summit

Participants in the Getty Foundation's Multicultural Undergraduate Internship (MUI) program attend a session at the 2011 Arts Summit

On June 27, 119 students participating in the Getty Foundation’s Multicultural Undergraduate Internship program came to the Getty Center for the program’s annual Arts Summit. Interns chose from discussion topics led by arts professionals who shared their personal experience and… More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Research Institute

A Gallery Fit for a Prince and Now the Public? The Düsseldorf Gallery and the Modern Museum

View of a Room at Pommersfelden Palace. Johann Georg Pintz, printmaker; Salomon Kleiner, draftsman; in Representation au naturel des chateaux... (Augsburg, 1728), pl. 18. The Getty Research Institute,84-B21917

Most museum galleries have certain things in common. For one, the works are spaced a restful distance apart from one another on the wall. For another, they’re typically organized by school or theme. The focus might be, say, on fashion… More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Education, J. Paul Getty Museum

“Art Is Life. So to Learn It, You Engage with Life”: Mark Bradford on Teaching

A student and her self-portrait sculpture in coated wire
A student and her self-portrait sculpture in coated wire

Artist Mark Bradford recently visited one of Kristine Hatanaka’s art classes at Culver City High School to talk to students about works they’d created based on his art-making activity RE-RE-Process, available through Open Studio. Initiated by Mark as part of… More»

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Posted in Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum

Play the Paris Gallery Game!

Find the six things that are different in this portrait of Gabriel Bernard de Rieux created by Maurice-Quentin de La Tour about 1739–41

The exhibition Paris: Life & Luxury transports you to an affluent Parisian home in the mid-1700s. It’s presented in a series of rooms that show the activities an elite family would have performed in the morning, afternoon, and evening—from dressing… More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Prints and Drawings

The Drawing That Once Hung in Thomas Jefferson’s Parlor

The Fright of Astyanax (Hector Bidding Farewell to Andromache), Benjamin West, 1797. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 84.GG.722
The Fright of Astyanax (Hector Bidding Farewell to Andromache), Benjamin West, 1797. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 84.GG.722

An American has slipped his way into exclusive British company—the exhibition Luminous Paper: British Watercolors and Drawings, opening July 19. Owned for years by Thomas Jefferson, admirer of all things classical, this pen-and-ink by Pennsylvania-born artist Benjamin West depicts a… More»

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      Masked Harlequin, the commedia dell’arte’s leading man, lures an innocent, elegantly dressed young lady into the world of prostitution. She’s caught the eye of a displeased young man, dressed in dapper clothes. They stand out in this scene of costumed characters in exaggerated clothing. 

      Gillot’s light, quick brushstrokes mimics the satirical subject and lighthearted portrayal of human folly.

      Fashion Fridays explores art, history, and costume inspired by the exhibition Rococo to Revolution #NowOnView

      Scene from the Italian Comedy (recto), about 1700, Claude Gillot. The J. Paul Getty Museum

      07/25/14

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