Monthly Archives: January 2012

Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Research Institute

Fire and Ice: Artists Get Ready for the Pacific Standard Time Festival

A visitor admires one of the original Disappearing Environments structures in 1968. Photo: Lloyd Hamrol

From January 19 to 29, the Pacific Standard Time Performance and Public Art Festival will present more than 30 new public art commissions and re-invented works of performance art inspired by the amazing history of art in Southern California. As… More»

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , Leave a comment
Posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Cocteau Dreams, In Nitrate

Still from Jean Cocteau's Blood of a Poet

“One of the characteristics of the dream is that nothing surprises us in it. With no regret, we agree to live in it with strangers, completely cut off from our habits and friends.”―Jean Cocteau We’re offering an array of films… More»

Tagged , , , , , , , Leave a comment
Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Manuscripts and Books

The Manuscript Files: A Demon Whispering Sweet Nothings

Detail of Initial D: The Fool with Two Demons / Master of the Ingeborg Psalter

One of my favorite details from the current exhibition Gothic Grandeur comes from a French psalter of the early 1200s. A hallmark of Gothic art was an increasing sensitivity to the natural world, which led not only to a new… More»

Tagged , , , , , , Leave a comment
Posted in Antiquities, Architecture and Design, Getty Foundation, Philanthropy, Publications

Unlocking the Secrets of an Ancient Fountain

“Mudmen” pose in front of Chambers I and II at Peirene, on or about July 6, 1909

Do you picture archaeological sites as dry, dusty piles of stones? Meet Peirene, an ancient Greek ruin so tantalizing that archaeologists have literally died for it. Dry and dusty this place is not. The story of the alluring ruin is… More»

Tagged , , , , , , , Leave a comment
Posted in Exhibitions and Installations, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

The Ordinary Becomes Mystical: A Conversation with Betye Saar

Betye Saar at the Getty Center, November 16, 2011

On a Sunday, you might find artist Betye Saar at the Pasadena College flea market, scouting for treasures. The energetic 85-year-old is still an active hunter of offbeat and unusual objects, which she combines into sculptures filled with personal, spiritual,… More»

Tagged , , , , , , , , , 1 Response
Posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, Getty Research Institute

Treasures from the Vault: Artwork by Richard Tuttle Discovered in the Archive of Galerie Schmela

Detail of calligraphy in a letter from Richard Tuttle to Alfred Schmela, 1968

As I was recently working on the archive of  the German art dealer Alfred Schmela, I discovered an unusual  mailing  sent by American postminimalist artist Richard Tuttle. Addressed to Alfred Schmela and his wife Monika in Düsseldorf, Germany, it was… More»

Tagged , , , , , , Leave a comment
  • Facebook

  • Twitter

  • Tumblr

    • photo from Tumblr

      It’s been 125 years since Van Gogh’s death, today we celebrate his life’s work.


      5 Ways to See Van Gogh’s Irises

      Through observations, visitor conversations, and some sneaky eavesdropping, we’ve compiled the top 5 ways people enjoy this painting.

      1. In a Crowd
        One of the most obvious ways that people see the painting is in a crowd. The gallery is almost always filled, and you might have to wait before you can get up close. The anticipation builds as you start in the back row, and slowly move until you are close enough to see the brushstrokes of Van Gogh’s thick paint.

      2. Online
        David from Colorado said that this was his first visit, but he had already seen the painting online. In addition to being available through the Getty’s Open Content program, the painting is often seen on social media. Just search #irises on Instagram for a taste of the painting’s popularity. 

      3. Alone
        If you arrive right at 10 a.m. when the museum opens, the quiet gallery provides a perfect backdrop to really examine the painting. Solitude and seclusion gives the gallery a sense of intimacy. 

      4. Multiple Times
        Repeat visits can give rise to multiple interpretations. Is it a melancholy or joyous painting? Expressive or depressive? 

      5. Internationally
        Visitors from all across the world viewed this famous Van Gogh. In just one hour I heard multiple languages—French, Italian, Chinese, Korean, German, and more. Irises seems to rise above cultural boundaries—a Dutch painting inspired by Japanese ukiyo-e prints—to strike an emotional resonance amongst all viewers. 

      What is your favorite lens to view Van Gogh’s work through? 

      07/29/15

  • Flickr