Monthly Archives: February 2013

Posted in Gardens and Architecture

For California Gardeners, Winter Is the New Summer

European honeybee on tidy tips in the Central Garden

Winter, the sere season? Not in California, where the cool months are our lushest, our most verdant of all. More»

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Posted in Art, Gardens and Architecture, Manuscripts and Books, Voices

Getty Voices: Renaissance Gardens

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A journey through Renaissance gardens and their paradoxes: natural and artificial, sin and salvation, virtue and vice. More»

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Posted in Art, Education, Research

Six Questions for Art Detective Victoria Reed

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What does a provenance researcher do? And how does she do it? More»

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Posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, Paintings

What Makes an Artist Great? Curator Scott Schaefer on Vermeer

Woman in Blue Reading a Letter / Johannes Vermeer as installed at the Getty Center
Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam. On loan from the City of Amsterdam (A. van der Hoop Bequest)

Johannes Vermeer is a beloved artist. Is he also a great one? More»

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Posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, Paintings, Voices

Getty Voices: The Power of Vermeer

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Vermeer’s newly arrived Woman in Blue Reading a Letter seems calmly at home in our galleries—but introduces a distinctive new presence. More»

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Posted in Art, Getty Research Institute, Prints and Drawings

Beware Cupid’s Arrow! French Print Reveals Dangers of Romantic Mix-Ups

Detail of the Exchange of Arrows Between Death and Cupid / Pierre Landry
Unlikely.

It could happen to you: comic mix-ups, near-death encounters, and other tales of accursed romance from French prints at the Getty Research Institute. More»

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Posted in Art, Paintings, Voices

Getty Voices: The Forgotten Surrealist

Wolfgang Paalen with his portrait of Andre Breton
Courtesy Museo Franz Mayer, Mexico City

“A feeling of surprise, even disbelief, that someone so unique could have remained unknown to us for so long.” More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Paintings

Write the Opening Line to Vermeer’s “Lady in Blue”

Detail of woman's face and letter in Woman in Blue Reading a Letter / Vermeer
Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam. On loan from the City of Amsterdam (A. van der Hoop Bequest)

What do you imagine the first line of this letter might say? Share your ideas, and we’ll continue the story. More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Photographs, Film, and Video

Whispers and Shadows: Ray K. Metzker and “Street Noir”

City Whispers, Philadelphia / Ray K. Metzker
© Ray K. Metzker

“I imagine the people in Metzker’s photographs as supporting characters in a film noir—captured on an average day, precisely at the loneliest moment before the cruel twist of fate takes hold.” More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, J. Paul Getty Trust, Voices

New “Getty Voices” Project Features Creative Angles on Art and Culture, One Week at a Time

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This morning we launched Getty Voices, a new social media project on The Iris led by a different member of the Getty community every week. More»

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      ROSE

      This milky pink boomed into popularity because of a marketing ploy, a mistress, and its ambiguous origins.

      In an effort to compete with the renowned Meissen porcelain factory, the French Sèvres manufactory recruited the glamorous Madame de Pompadour (mistress to King Louis XV). Like a smart sponsorship deal, Sèvres gave her all the porcelain she requested. 

      Introduced in 1757, this rich pink exploded on the scene thanks to favoritism by Madame Pompadour herself. 

      The glaze itself had a weird history. To the Europeans it looked Chinese, and to the Chinese it was European. It was made based on a secret 17th-century glassmaker’s technique, involving mixing glass with flecks of gold.

      For more on colors and their often surprising histories, check out The Brilliant History of Color in Art.

      12/19/14

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