Monthly Archives: November 2013

Posted in Art

MAKE ART/STOP AIDS

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“MAKE ART/STOP AIDS demonstrates how art can make things happen in the world, how it can teach and goad and shift and protect us. “ More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Manuscripts and Books

They That Go Down To The Sea In Ships

The Calling of Saints Peter and Andrew / Master of the Brussels Initials
The Calling of Saints Peter and Andrew, about 1389–1404, Master of the Brussels Initials. Tempera colors, gold leaf, gold paint, and ink on parchment, 13 x 9 7/16 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Ms. 34, fol. 172

A reflection on the Feast of Saint Andrew, celebrated at Canterbury Cathedral. More»

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Posted in Ancient World, Antiquities, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Villa

The Cyrus Cylinder as Design Object

The Cyrus Cylinder / Achaemenid
The British Museum

Why explains the Cyrus Cylinder’s shape? More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Center

Traditional English Recipes with a California Flair

Spotted Dick at the Restaurant at the Getty Center
A contemporary spin on Spotted Dick, the traditional English pudding made with dried fruit. Here it's served with fruit compote and a creamy almond custard

Our chefs share their 21st-century updates on traditional English favorites. More»

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Posted in Art

19 Ways to Be Part of the Arts on #GivingTuesday

Visitors at the Sketching Gallery at the Getty Center
One good way to support art: make some!

In celebration of Giving Tuesday, a list of simple ideas to get involved in the arts—and receive even more back. More»

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Posted in Architecture and Design, Getty Research Institute, Photographs, Film, and Video

Dynamic L.A.: Images from the Julius Shulman Photography Archive Now Available

Julius Shulman photographing Case Study House no. 22, West Hollywood, 1960
Julius Shulman photographing Case Study House no. 22, West Hollywood, 1960. Julius Shulman photography archive. The Getty Research Institute, 2004.R.10

6,500 newly digitized images depict the development of Los Angeles architecture across decades. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, J. Paul Getty Museum

Ready for Reddit – Tim Potts in an “Ask Me Anything” Session Monday, November 25

Timothy Potts / Director of the Getty Museum / 2013
Tim Potts

Have a question for the director of the Getty Museum? Ask him! He’ll be on Reddit starting at noon PST. More»

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Posted in Getty Center, J. Paul Getty Trust

Why Give Time to the Arts? 6 Questions for Getty Volunteer Stephen Thorne

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Say “Guten Tag!” to Stephen Thorne, one of the Getty Center’s first volunteers. More»

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Posted in Ancient World, Conservation, Getty Conservation Institute

Inside the Bulla Regia Model Field Project | Getty Voices

GCI consultant and project team member, Livia Alberti, working with conservation technician Mondher Habachi. Photo: Scott S. Warren
GCI consultant and project team member, Livia Alberti, working with conservation technician Mondher Habachi. Photo: Scott S. Warren

What does it take to preserve an entire ancient Roman structure? More»

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Posted in Art, Photographs, Film, and Video

Windows Around Us

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A closer look at the windows that frame our world, on social media and IRL. More»

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      All Hail Tiberius, Least Media-Savvy of the Roman Emperors

      Tiberius was proclaimed Roman emperor on September 17 in AD 14, exactly 2,000 years ago.

      He was also a bit wacko. “He was the least media-savvy emperor you could imagine,” says curator David Saunders, who has been in charge of this bronze portrait of Tiberius which leaves us on September 22. He point to this description found in the writings of Cassius Dio:

      Tiberius was a patrician of good education, but he had a most peculiar nature. He never let what he desired appear in his conversation, and what he said he wanted he usually did not desire at all. On the contrary, his words indicated the exact opposite of his real purpose; he denied all interest in what he longed for, and urged the claims of what he hated. He would exhibit anger over matters that were far from arousing his wrath, and make a show of affability where he was most vexed…In short, he thought it bad policy for the sovereign to reveal his thoughts; this was often the cause, he said, of great failures, whereas by the opposite course, far more and greater successes were attained.

      Moreover, David tells us, “Tiberius’s accession itself was a farrago: Tiberius sort-of feigning reluctance, the Senate bullying him, he being all, ‘Well, if-I-have-to,’ and in the end—according to Suetonius—saying he’ll do it as long as he can retire.”

      Suetonius is full of great, albeit spurious, anecdotes about poor old Tiberius, David reports. “When someone addressed him as ‘My Lord,’ it is said, Tiberius gave warning that no such insult should ever again be thrown at him.”

      Happy accession, My Lord!

      Portrait Head of Tiberius (“The Lansdowne Tiberius”), early 1st century A.D., Roman. The J. Paul Getty Museum

      Statue of Tiberius (detail), Roman, A.D. 37, Soprintendenza Speciale per i Beni Archeologici di Napoli e Pompei – Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Napoli, Laboratorio di Conservazione e Restauro. Currently on view at the Getty Villa following conservation and study.

      09/17/14

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