Monthly Archives: March 2014

Posted in Behind the Scenes, Philanthropy

Creativity Blooms at Inner-City Arts on L.A.’s Skid Row

Inner-City Arts
Inner-City Arts is a haven of safety and creativity in the heart of L.A.'s Skid Row.

Getty staff team up to give back to Inner-City arts, a pearl of arts education in the chaos of L.A.’s concrete jungle. More»

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Posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Children in Another World: The Photographs of Arthur Tress

Boy with Root Hands, New York, New York, 1971. Arthur Tress (American, born 1940). Gelatin silver print. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles. © Arthur Tress.
Boy with Root Hands, New York, New York, 1971, Arthur Tress. Gelatin silver print, 10 1/16 x 10 3/16 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 2013.68.13. © Arthur Tress

The inner lives of children take form in the American photographer’s surreal, compelling images. More»

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Posted in Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Manuscripts and Books

Medieval Masterpieces from Greece Now on View

The Divine Liturgy of Saint Basil in a liturgical scroll, Vermion, 1100s. Parchment, 26 x 10 in. Image courtesy of the National Library of Greece, Athens, cod 2759  [VEX.2014.2.73]
The Divine Liturgy of Saint Basil in a liturgical scroll, made in Vermion, 1100s. Parchment, 26 x 10 in. Image courtesy of the National Library of Greece, Athens, cod 2759

The largest presentation of Byzantine art ever seen in Los Angeles begins on Greek Independence Day. More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Photographs, Film, and Video

Diorama-rama: History Behind Glass

Polar Bear, 1976, Hiroshi Sugimoto (Japanese, born 1948), gelatin silver print, © Hiroshi Sugimoto, The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles, Purchased with funds provided by the Photographs Council
© Hiroshi Sugimoto

Photographer Hiroshi Sugimoto plays with dioramas’ tension between real and fake, fact and spectacle. More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Photographs, Film, and Video

What Ansel Adams Taught Me

Mt. Williamson, Sierra Nevada, from Manzanar, California / Ansel Adams
© 2014 The Ansel Adams Publishing Rights Trust

The photographer was nothing like this young artist imagined. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, J. Paul Getty Museum

Great Literature Inspires Culinary Creations for “Selected Shorts”

Pea tendrils with scallop / Getty Restaurant
Spring on a plate: Pea tendrils over scallop pays humorous homage to Lydia Davis's story "Letter to a Frozen Peas Manufacturer"

Two of life’s pleasures come together this weekend: stories and food. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Education, Getty Research Institute

Art History Is for Kids!

Arrr, Holden!
Arrr, Holden!

Young (but savvy) pirate explorers conquer the Connecting Seas exhibition, offering some telling observations. More»

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Posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, J. Paul Getty Museum, Prints and Drawings

Why Is This Drawing in a Museum?

Abstract Lines / Degas
The mysterious drawing in question. Abstract Lines, about 1877, Edgar Degas. J. Paul Getty Museum.

A look inside a sketchbook by Degas reveals the story behind a unusual drawing. More»

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Posted in Ancient World, Antiquities

Beware the Ides of March

Beware the Ides of March / Julius Caesar
Consult a good soothsayer before heading out this weekend. Artwork: Portrait of Julius Caesar (detail) from the Forum of Trajan, Rome. National Archaeological Museum, Naples, Inv. 6038. Photo: S. Sosnovskiy, 2008

If the sacrificial liver looks bad, stay home…and other soothsaying wisdom from ancient Rome. More»

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Posted in Art, Photographs, Film, and Video

Show Us Your #VictorianPose

#Victorian Pose

Look judgy and flash your monocle! The #VictorianPose sweepstakes is here. More»

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      It’s been 125 years since Van Gogh’s death, today we celebrate his life’s work.


      5 Ways to See Van Gogh’s Irises

      Through observations, visitor conversations, and some sneaky eavesdropping, we’ve compiled the top 5 ways people enjoy this painting.

      1. In a Crowd
        One of the most obvious ways that people see the painting is in a crowd. The gallery is almost always filled, and you might have to wait before you can get up close. The anticipation builds as you start in the back row, and slowly move until you are close enough to see the brushstrokes of Van Gogh’s thick paint.

      2. Online
        David from Colorado said that this was his first visit, but he had already seen the painting online. In addition to being available through the Getty’s Open Content program, the painting is often seen on social media. Just search #irises on Instagram for a taste of the painting’s popularity. 

      3. Alone
        If you arrive right at 10 a.m. when the museum opens, the quiet gallery provides a perfect backdrop to really examine the painting. Solitude and seclusion gives the gallery a sense of intimacy. 

      4. Multiple Times
        Repeat visits can give rise to multiple interpretations. Is it a melancholy or joyous painting? Expressive or depressive? 

      5. Internationally
        Visitors from all across the world viewed this famous Van Gogh. In just one hour I heard multiple languages—French, Italian, Chinese, Korean, German, and more. Irises seems to rise above cultural boundaries—a Dutch painting inspired by Japanese ukiyo-e prints—to strike an emotional resonance amongst all viewers. 

      What is your favorite lens to view Van Gogh’s work through? 

      07/29/15

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