Monthly Archives: August 2014

Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations

Garry Winogrand’s Scenes of Ebulliance, and Unease

Coney Island, New York. c. 1952. Gelatin silver print, 8 11/16 x 12 15/16" (22 x 33 cm). Purchase and gift of Barbara Schwartz in memory of Eugene M. Schwartz. Estate of Garry Winogrand, courtesy of Fraenkel Gallery
Coney Island, New York. c. 1952. Gelatin silver print, 8 11/16 x 12 15/16" (22 x 33 cm). Purchase and gift of Barbara Schwartz in memory of Eugene M. Schwartz. Estate of Garry Winogrand, courtesy of Fraenkel Gallery

A retrospective now at the Met captures America’s postwar “out-of-control-ness” More»

Tagged , , , , , , Leave a comment
Posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

The Bully Has Left the Room

Untitled / George Seeley
Untitled, about 1903, George Seeley. Platinum print, 19.2 x 24.3 cm. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles, 84.XM.163.3.

While James Ensor is away, Pictorialist photographs will play. More»

Tagged , , , Leave a comment
Posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, Education, J. Paul Getty Museum

Art for the Whole Body

DH0A5387_edit

New tours combine movement, mindfulness, and sharing to engage with art “below the neck.” More»

Tagged , , , , , , 4 Responses
Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Villa

Aeschylus’s Persian Queen: An Actor’s Craft

SITI Company rehearses Persians
In rehearsal: Ellen Lauren (foreground) as the queen of Persia; Will Bond (left) as the Messenger

Bringing alive an ancient queen. More»

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , 2 Responses
Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Foundation, Getty Villa

5 Tips for Making the Most of an Arts Internship

Corinne (left) and Gaby (center) in a productive meeting with Getty Villa exhibitions coordinator Robin McCarthy (right)
DO participate in meetings! Corinne (left) and Gaby (center) in a productive meeting with Getty Villa exhibitions coordinator Robin McCarthy (right)

Road-tested advice for launching your career in an arts organization. More»

Tagged , , , , , Leave a comment
Posted in Art, Getty Research Institute, Research

Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names Released as Linked Open Data

Linked Open Data / Ellora Caves in India

Vast database of geographic places is now available for free download. More»

Tagged , , , , , , , , , 3 Responses
Posted in Getty Center

Fashion Off the 405, Weekender Edition

fashion_off_the_405_2

In focus: visitors’ weekend style. More»

Tagged , , Leave a comment
Posted in Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Getty Conservation Institute

Conservation Tools: The GC/MS Instrument

Joy Mazurek of the Getty Conservation Institute with a GC/MS instrument
Joy Mazurek of the Getty Conservation Institute explaining what happens inside the GC/MS instrument during analysis.

This scientific tool helps conservators understand artwork from the tiniest of samples. More»

Tagged , , , , , , Leave a comment
Posted in Behind the Scenes, Education, J. Paul Getty Museum

Everything You Wanted to Know about Medieval Arms and Armor

edit2

Come see how arms and armor are made in free demos at the Getty Center. More»

Tagged , , , , Leave a comment
Posted in Ancient World, Getty Villa, J. Paul Getty Museum

A Guide to Aeschylus’s “Persians”

Ellen Lauren as Persian Queen Atossa against a backdrop of golden drapery
Play in progress: Ellen Lauren as Persian Queen Atossa against a backdrop of golden drapery. Photo: Sara Radamacher

A theater-goer’s guide to the western world’s oldest play. More»

Tagged , , , , , , , 4 Responses
  • Facebook

  • Twitter

  • Tumblr

    • photo from Tumblr

      ROSE

      This milky pink boomed into popularity because of a marketing ploy, a mistress, and its ambiguous origins.

      In an effort to compete with the renowned Meissen porcelain factory, the French Sèvres manufactory recruited the glamorous Madame de Pompadour (mistress to King Louis XV). Like a smart sponsorship deal, Sèvres gave her all the porcelain she requested. 

      Introduced in 1757, this rich pink exploded on the scene thanks to favoritism by Madame Pompadour herself. 

      The glaze itself had a weird history. To the Europeans it looked Chinese, and to the Chinese it was European. It was made based on a secret 17th-century glassmaker’s technique, involving mixing glass with flecks of gold.

      For more on colors and their often surprising histories, check out The Brilliant History of Color in Art.

      12/19/14

  • Flickr