About: Susan Lansing Maish, Eduardo P. Sánchez, and Erin Branham

Susan Lansing Maish I’m assistant conservator in the Department of Antiquities Conservation at the J. Paul Getty Museum, where I have worked for 25 years. I am very excited to be working on such a rare and beautiful collection of silver artifacts, the Berthouville Treasure, and am very interested in the stories each object has to tell us. It is little like being a detective, unraveling the manufacturing and restoration histories of these objects. Eduardo P. Sánchez I’m associate conservator in the Department of Antiquities Conservation at the J. Paul Getty Museum. During my 25 years with the Museum, I’ve worked on numerous exhibitions and in-depth collaborative projects of both domestic and international scale, such as the conservation of an important imperial Roman portrait sculpture of the Emperor Marcus Aurelius owned by the Pergamon Museum in Berlin, Germany, and the first major exhibition in the U.S. devoted to ancient mosaic masterpieces from Tunisia, Stories in Stone: Conserving Mosaics of Roman Africa. Currently I am working on a collaborative conservation project with the Cabinet des Médailles in the Bibliothèque nationale de France to complete the conservation of Roman silver luxury items that are part of the Berthouville Treasure. I am overseeing the documentation, assessment, and conservation of these extraordinary pieces, which will be displayed at the Getty Villa before the collection is returns to France. Erin Branham I'm the education specialist for family programs at the Getty Villa. In addition to the Villa Teen Apprentice program, I oversee tours, workshops, and drop-in programs designed for parents and children to enjoy together as they learn about art of the ancient world. I've been in museum education for over 20 years and hold a master's degree in art education from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

Posts by Susan Lansing Maish, Eduardo P. Sánchez,

Posted in Antiquities, Behind the Scenes, Getty Villa, J. Paul Getty Museum

Conserving the Berthouville Treasure

Early 20th-century print of silver vessel number 11 from the Berthouville Treasure
Early 20th-century print of silver vessel number 11 from the Berthouville Treasure. Plate XV in Ernest Babelon, Le trésor d'argenterie de Berthouville près Bernay (Eure) (Paris, 1916). The Getty Research Institute, 2908-151

Conservation treatment represents an important moment in the life of an object, and this is particularly true for the Berthouville Treasure, an extraordinary group of Gallo-Roman silver that arrived at the Getty Villa two years ago. In collaboration with the… More»

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