About: David Saunders and Annelisa Stephan

David Saunders I’m assistant curator in the Department of Antiquities at the J. Paul Getty Museum and co-curator of Apollo from Pompeii: Investigating an Ancient Bronze. In 2009 I curated The Golden Graves of Ancient Vani at the Getty Villa. I'm currently developing exhibitions on Aphrodite and on a group of large South Italian vases that were restored in the 19th century. Exhibitions aside, my main research interests lie with ancient Greek vase-painting and iconography. Annelisa Stephan I'm senior Web writer/editor at the J. Paul Getty Trust and editor of The Iris. What does a Web editor do all day? She writes, creates, revises, and nitpicks text, photos, videos, and other fun stuff so that it's as interesting, accurate, and easy to find as possible, whether here on the blog, on our online exhibitions, in our visitor section, in our e-Getty newsletter (sign up!), on our Flickr stream or Museum Facebook page, or wherever else you might be looking for it.

Posts by David Saunders and

Posted in Antiquities, Exhibitions and Installations, Gardens and Architecture, J. Paul Getty Museum

Chiurazzi Bronzes, from Pompeii to Malibu

Replica of a Roman bronze sculpture of Apollo as an Archer in the ruins of Pompeii
Replica of a Roman bronze sculpture of Apollo as an Archer in the ruins of Pompeii

The two bronze statues at the heart of the current Getty Villa exhibition Apollo from Pompeii: Investigating an Ancient Bronze—set to close September 12—may look rather familiar if you’ve traveled to Pompeii or seen it in pictures. For as you… More»

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      #ThyCaptionBe: Don’t Be So Crabby

      You captioned this detail. And we’re revealing the full story now.

      Jaws reference or some rather nasty surf and turf? It’s actually a depiction of the astrological symbol for Cancer.

      Here’s the full story:

      This peasant might be tired from working in the hot sun, but this is no time to go for a swim to cool off! 

      We all know there’s a risk of encountering creepy crawlers when out gardening, but that giant sinister lobster lurking in the water is actually a crab – the astrological symbol for Cancer. 

      Medieval prayer books often include a yearly calendar at the beginning of the text listing important feast days. Each month is usually accompanied by illuminations of seasonal activities and zodiacal signs, such as this one for the month of June.

      #ThyCaptionBe is a celebration of modern interpretations of medieval aesthetics. You guess what the heck is going on, then we myth-bust.


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