About: David Saunders and Annelisa Stephan

David Saunders I’m assistant curator in the Department of Antiquities at the J. Paul Getty Museum and co-curator of Apollo from Pompeii: Investigating an Ancient Bronze. In 2009 I curated The Golden Graves of Ancient Vani at the Getty Villa. I'm currently developing exhibitions on Aphrodite and on a group of large South Italian vases that were restored in the 19th century. Exhibitions aside, my main research interests lie with ancient Greek vase-painting and iconography. Annelisa Stephan I'm senior Web writer/editor at the J. Paul Getty Trust and editor of The Iris. What does a Web editor do all day? She writes, creates, revises, and nitpicks text, photos, videos, and other fun stuff so that it's as interesting, accurate, and easy to find as possible, whether here on the blog, on our online exhibitions, in our visitor section, in our e-Getty newsletter (sign up!), on our Flickr stream or Museum Facebook page, or wherever else you might be looking for it.

Posts by David Saunders and

Posted in Ancient World, Editor's Picks, Getty Villa, Getty360

What Does the Acropolis Mean? A Conversation with Thomas Gallant

The Parthenon / Edward Dodwell
The Packard Humanities Institute

The Athenian monument as structure and symbol. More»

Tagged , , , , : | Leave a comment
Posted in Antiquities, Art & Archives, Exhibitions and Installations, Gardens and Architecture, J. Paul Getty Museum, People & Places

Chiurazzi Bronzes, from Pompeii to Malibu

Replica of a Roman bronze sculpture of Apollo as an Archer in the ruins of Pompeii
Replica of a Roman bronze sculpture of Apollo as an Archer in the ruins of Pompeii

The two bronze statues at the heart of the current Getty Villa exhibition Apollo from Pompeii: Investigating an Ancient Bronze—set to close September 12—may look rather familiar if you’ve traveled to Pompeii or seen it in pictures. For as you… More»

Tagged , , , , , , , , : | 1 Response
  • Facebook

  • Twitter

  • Tumblr

    • photo from Tumblr

      #ProvenancePeek: Titian in Boston

      Every art object has a story—not only of how it was made, but of how it changed hands over time until it found its current home. That story is provenance.

      Portrait of a Man Holding a Book, in the collection of Boston’s Museum of Fine Arts, is no exception. The MFA carefully details the painting’s Italian provenance on its collection page, but the path of this object even since then is complex.

      Between 1901 and 1907, Portrait of a Man Holding a Book entered the stock of no less than three galleries, purchased from the Italian family who owned it first by Agnew’s in London, then by Trotti in Paris, and then by Cottier in New York (marking its movement from the Old World to the New). A collector purchased it from Cottier, and the painting was held privately for 36 years.

      That collector was Frederick Bayley Pratt (1865–1945), son of Charles Pratt, oil magnate and founder of the Brooklyn Institute that bears his family’s name (incidentally, this writer’s alma mater!). 

      The Knoedler Gallery dealt frequently with members of the Pratt family. A quick peek into the searchable database of Knoedler’s stock books turns up nine instances in which a Pratt (Charles and Mary, Frederick’s parents, or Herbert and John, his brothers) bought works, as well as five instances where they sold works. This Titian portrait is one of those instances. Frederick Pratt sold the work to Knoedler in early April of 1943, and by the 10th, it had been snapped up by the Museum of Fine Arts.

      Knoedler shared the sale with Pinakos, an art-dealing concern owned and operated by Rudolf J. Heinemann. Purchasing works in tandem with other dealers was a widespread practice amongst powerful art galleries of the time; nearly 6,000 records in the Knoedler database had joint ownership.

      The stock books of the Knoedler Gallery have recently been transformed into a searchable database that anyone can query for free. You can find this Titian under stock number A2555.

      Portrait of a Man Holding a Book, about 1540, Titian (Tiziano Vecellio). Oil on canvas. The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Charles Potter Kling Fund. Photograph © Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; stock and sales books documenting the painting’s sale by M. Knoedler & Co.

      _______

      ProvenancePeek is a monthly series by research assistant Kelly Davis peeking into provenance finds from the M. Knoedler & Co. archive at the Getty Research Institute.

      04/29/16

  • Flickr