About: David Saunders and Marie Svoboda

David Saunders I’m assistant curator in the Department of Antiquities at the J. Paul Getty Museum and co-curator of Apollo from Pompeii: Investigating an Ancient Bronze. In 2009 I curated The Golden Graves of Ancient Vani at the Getty Villa. I'm currently developing exhibitions on Aphrodite and on a group of large South Italian vases that were restored in the 19th century. Exhibitions aside, my main research interests lie with ancient Greek vase-painting and iconography. Marie Svoboda I'm associate conservator in the Antiquities Conservation Department at the J. Paul Getty Museum. I spent over six years at the Museum of Fine Arts, focusing on the conservation of their Egyptian and Classical collections. At the Getty Villa, I work on exhibitions and loans as well as in-depth conservation and research projects, such as the investigation of our Romano-Egyptian red-shroud mummy, which has culminated in a recent publication, and the examination and treatment of four remarkable Apulian vases, a collaborative project with the Antikensammulung, Berlin. I also hope to initiate a large collaborative study of Roman mummy portraits.

Posts by David Saunders and

Posted in Antiquities, Art & Archives, Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Getty Villa, J. Paul Getty Museum

Looking at Apulian Vases in a New Light

Loutrophoros / Greek, 300s B.C.

Since 2008, the antiquities conservation and curatorial departments at the J. Paul Getty Museum have been working with colleagues at the Antikensammlung in Berlin to study and conserve a group of South Italian (Apulian) vases dating to the 4th century… More»

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Posted in Antiquities, Art & Archives, Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Getty Villa, J. Paul Getty Museum

Forensic Techniques Illuminate a New Acquisition

Oil jar (lekythos) with a funerary scene, attributed to the Achilles Painter, Greek, made in Athens, about 435–430 B.C. Terracotta, 17 3/4 in high x 5 5/16 in. diam. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 2011.14

The recently acquired white-ground lekythos on display in Women and Children in Antiquity (Gallery 207) at the Getty Villa is a handsome addition to the Museum’s antiquities collection. With its narrow neck and cylindrical body, this popular type of vase… More»

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      Color for Healing

      This sanitorium (tuberculosis hospital) in Paimio, Finland, was designed by architect Alvar Aalto in the 1920s. Unlike many hospitals, it was full of bright colors—including welcoming yellow on the main stairs and calming green for ceilings above bedridden patients. Aalto even created special chairs to open the chest and speed healing.

      The building’s colors were mostly whitewashed later in the 20th century, but now—due to a grant from the Getty Foundation as part of its Keeping It Modern initiative—its colors are being reconstructed and the building preserved for the future.

      More of the story: Saving Alvar Aalto’s Paimio Sanitorium

      Pictured: Paimio Sanatorium, patients’ wing and solarium terraces. Photo: Maija Holma, Alvar Aalto Museum. A color model for Paimio Sanatorium interiors by decorative artist Eino Kauria. Photo: Maija Holma, Alvar Aalto Museum, 2016.Paimio chairs (Artek no 41) in the Paimio Sanatorium lecture room, 1930s. Photo: Gustaf Welin, Alvar Aalto Museum. Aino Aalto resting in a chair on the solarium terrace. Photo: Alvar Aalto, Alvar Aalto Museum, 1930s. Main stairs of Paimio Sanatorium. Photo: Maija Holma, Alvar Aalto Museum.

      04/30/16

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