About: Tim Hart

I'm head of market research at the J. Paul Getty Trust. I track and evaluate Web traffic and conduct surveys, usability studies, and focus groups. Collecting data and analyzing it is an occupational hazard; once you start it's hard to stop. I caught myself asking my four-year-old if she liked chocolate cake because it was chocolate or because I made it. Her look said it all: "Really, Dad?" If pressed, I'm sure I could quantify why I'd rather be surfing, or hiking, or playing poker, or just hanging with my wife and kids.

Posts by Tim

Posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum

Justice, Vengeance, Crime, Love, and Van Gogh

Justice and Divine Vengeance Pursuing Crime, Pierre-Paul Prud'hon, about about 1805–06

Which art objects on the Getty Museum’s website are most popular? The answers might surprise you—or perhaps confirm what you’ve always suspected about the Internet.

Over the past year, three objects have vied for the top spot, each for different reasons. More»

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      I do not like crooked, twisted, blasted trees. I admire them much more if they are tall, straight, and flourishing. I do not like ruined, tattered cottages. I am not fond of nettles or thistles, or heath blossoms. I have more pleasure in a snug farm-house than a watch-tower—and a troop of tidy, happy villages please me better than the finest banditti in the world.”

      Marianne looked with amazement at Edward, with compassion at her sister. Elinor only laughed.

      —Jane Austen’s Sense and Sensibility, published on October 30, 1811

      Wooded Landscape by Paulus Lieder and Landscape with a Bare Tree and a Ploughman by Leon Bonvin, The J. Paul Getty Museum; Fantastic Oak Tree in the Woods, Carl Wilhelm Kolbe the Elder, The Getty Research Institute

      10/30/14

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