Art, Behind the Scenes, J. Paul Getty Museum, Paintings

Connect with Art Using Google Goggles and Our New Mobile Collection Pages!

What is that painting? Wonder no longer. By taking a photo with the Google Goggles™ app for your smartphone, you can now instantly identify any painting in our collection, plus access related information and audio. Awesome, right?

We created a Google demo slam video so you can see it in action!


Goggles works by performing a visual search using image-recognition technology. We created special mobile versions of our collection Web pages (some with audio). Google then took that, along with high-quality photographs of our paintings collection, and incorporated it into their Goggles technology. A visual search returns the most accurate and relevant results, beginning with our information and related resources. Try it out on any Getty painting in the galleries … or even on reproductions.

Video crew relaxing after the shoot

Video crew relaxing after the shoot


The Goggles app also works pretty well with images of museum object labels. Snap a photo with your smartphone and the app captures the text and enables you to translate it into over 50 different languages.

The Web is about making connections … and so are museums. Museums are now venturing beyond their walls and into your space. Now with mobile devices and social media you can select and use whatever you want. And keep it in your pocket.

Get details on how to use the Google Goggles app at the Getty Center.

Rock stars who helped make this happen!

Rock stars who helped make this happen!

This project happened fast and furiously. Huge shout out to my colleagues who helped make it happen: Museum digital media guru Steve Gemmel on drums, mobilizing web engineer wizard Ted Dancescu on lead guitar, and Wi-Fi techno hero David Wholihan on bass guitar.

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2 Comments

  1. frances hubbard
    Posted February 6, 2013 at 2:44 pm | Permalink

    I HAVE SEEN A PAINTING , A COPY OF AN ORIGINAL IN OILS, LIKE AN OLD MASTER AND I WANT TO KNOW WHO PAINTED IT ORIGINALLY. HOW CAN I FIND THIS OUT? i have the picture on my phone, can you please advise.

    • Annelisa Stephan
      Posted February 6, 2013 at 9:11 pm | Permalink

      Hi Frances, We get a lot of questions like yours; hoping this will help you and others who may be looking for the information:

      You could certainly try Google Goggles (an image-based search tool for smartphones/tablets) to see if it would recognize it. You’ll need to install the app on your device, then take a photo of the copy and see if Google can identify it.

      You can do essentially the same thing via a Web browser through Google’s “Search by Image” feature. Take a photo (or have a tech-savvy helper do so) of the object and upload it to Google here: http://images.google.com/imghp?hl=en. The search engine will compare your photo to others on the Web via a visual algorithm and help you identify the original.

      If neither of these works, you could browse the web to get a general sense of which era/style your object represents. Google Art Project (http://www.googleartproject.com/) has thousands of objects from museums around the world and might provide clues to the time period/culture/style/artist you have in hand. That could help you narrow it down for further study.

      Best of luck. Annelisa, Iris editor

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      ROSE

      This milky pink boomed into popularity because of a marketing ploy, a mistress, and its ambiguous origins.

      In an effort to compete with the renowned Meissen porcelain factory, the French Sèvres manufactory recruited the glamorous Madame de Pompadour (mistress to King Louis XV). Like a smart sponsorship deal, Sèvres gave her all the porcelain she requested. 

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