Getty Center, J. Paul Getty Museum

Did You Dance? Saturdays Off the 405 Season Finale Plus Bonus Playlist!

We really turned it up this year at Saturdays Off the 405 with an eclectic mix of the best and brightest new music—including a season finale on October 9 with New Wave favorite the Tom Tom Club, doing totally live versions of their hits without sequencers or backing tapes.

Since bassist Tina Weymouth and drummer Chris Frantz were both members of the Talking Heads, we got to hear a few of those jams too. It was a warm night perfect for sparkle and an ’80s throwback dance party!

Tina (foreground) on bass in gold and pigtails, with vocalists, and Chris on drums in the background

Tina (foreground) on bass in gold and pigtails, with vocalists, and Chris on drums (background)

During their classic dancehall song “Genius of Love,” the band got on the stage floor and went for a ride…

Tom Tom Club performing at Saturdays Off the 405 at the Getty Center in Los Angeles

To continue the ride and celebrate the end of the season, we give you the Getty’s illustrious SOT405 2010 Official Playlist, featuring some of the awesome music that filled the Museum Courtyard this season.

See you next year for more outdoor music in the courtyard!

On the iMix:

Les Savy Fav—What Would Wolves Do?
Les Savy Fav—Sleepless in Silverlake
Mayer Hawthorne—Maybe So, Maybe No

Mayer Hawthorne—Just Ain’t Gonna Work Out

Dawes—Love Is All I Am

Dawes—When My Time Comes

Bomba Estéreo—Fuego

Bomba Estéreo—Feelin

The Antlers—Two

The Antlers—Shiva

Aloe Blacc—I Need a Dollar

Aloe Blacc—Find a Way

To­m Tom Club—Genius of Love

Tom Tom Club—Wordy Rappinghood (Live)

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One Comment

  1. Posted February 3, 2011 at 6:03 pm | Permalink

    Amazing info, I like this music.

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      ROSE

      This milky pink boomed into popularity because of a marketing ploy, a mistress, and its ambiguous origins.

      In an effort to compete with the renowned Meissen porcelain factory, the French Sèvres manufactory recruited the glamorous Madame de Pompadour (mistress to King Louis XV). Like a smart sponsorship deal, Sèvres gave her all the porcelain she requested. 

      Introduced in 1757, this rich pink exploded on the scene thanks to favoritism by Madame Pompadour herself. 

      The glaze itself had a weird history. To the Europeans it looked Chinese, and to the Chinese it was European. It was made based on a secret 17th-century glassmaker’s technique, involving mixing glass with flecks of gold.

      For more on colors and their often surprising histories, check out The Brilliant History of Color in Art.

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