Education, Getty Center, J. Paul Getty Museum

Experience Art Off the Beaten Path with New Summer Tours

Gallery teacher Lucena Valle explores materials in sculpture with participants on a Daily Detour

Gallery teacher Lucena Valle explores materials in sculpture with participants on a Daily Detour.

See the Museum’s collection from an insider’s point of view with three new tours at the Getty Center offered just for summer.

Why special tours for summer? We have more visitors in July and August—and we find that you’re often feeling more adventurous during the warmer months. In response, we in the education department decided to experiment with our daily programs to include new and varied approaches that offer different ways of engaging with art.

The ever-popular highlights tour continues at 11:00 a.m. every day—it’s a great choice if you’re a first-time visitor looking for an overview of the collection. But if you’re more of an “explorer” hungering for a journey off the beaten path, join us for one of these new offerings.

Begin your adventure with Morning Masterpiece at 10:30 a.m. weekdays: a short, focused viewing and discussion of one object in the collection. It’s a great way get inspired for your day at the Museum, and the friendly educators who lead the tour can offer tips for what to see next. Plus, you can join the discussion online at our Question of the Week discussions.

Come lunch, Stark Inspiration, at 12:30 p.m. weekdays, offers a 30-minute participatory and multisensory exploration of art. You might read a poem, hear a song performed live, or make a drawing—all to illuminate the meaning of modern sculpture.

Ann Erwin and Laura Lewis present a musical exploration of modern sculpture in the Museum Entrance Hall

Ann Erwin (on flute) and gallery teacher Laura Lewis present a musical exploration of 20th-century sculpture in the Museum Entrance Hall. Photo: John C. Lewis

Come back for Daily Detour at 3:00 p.m. daily, when an educator takes you and a group of other curious visitors on a unique hunt in search of works of art that aren’t typically featured in our highlights tour.

Usually the educator leading the tour comes prepared with a topic, such as “arts of fire” or “depictions of the goddess Venus,” but sometimes visitors help shape the tour by requesting subjects or artists they’d like to explore—on a recent hunt, for example, the group sought out  examples of porcelain featured in paintings.

As always, the tours are free, no reservations required. Just bring your spirit of adventure to the Museum Information Desk, and we’ll guide you from there.

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One Comment

  1. Bryan
    Posted August 10, 2011 at 8:23 am | Permalink

    Such fantastic ideas for a unique touring experience of the museum!

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