Art, Paintings

Scott Schaefer on the Meaning of Collecting

The Getty Museum’s retiring senior curator of paintings on art, access, and the cab ride he’ll never forget

One of the world’s great experts in European painting, Scott Schaefer is retiring from the Getty Museum this week. In his 14 years here, Scott has made it a point to walk in the galleries daily, asking security guards questions and answering them from the public. He even went undercover at the museum’s information desk once—because he values what you think and feel about the collection he’s helped to build for you.

We asked him to walk with us in the galleries one last time.

The museums in L.A. are so relatively new, Scott has taken to thinking of them collectively as “the greater museum of Los Angeles.”

“To me, it’s one museum in several locations,” said Scott, who also served as curator at LACMA. “There would be no point, for example, in the Getty—or any museum—buying a work of art by an artist who was already here unless it was better than that work or at least equal to it.”

We also asked Scott to divulge his favorite three paintings at the Getty, and share his answers with you here.

Farewell, Scott.

Tagged , , , , Bookmark the permalink. Post a comment or leave a trackback: Trackback URL.

Post a Comment

Your email is never published or shared. Required fields are marked *

*
*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

  • Facebook

  • Twitter

  • Tumblr

    • photo from Tumblr

      Cinco de Mayo celebrates the first battle of Puebla, which the Mexican army won in 1862. This perspective theater commemorates the *second* battle of Puebla in 1863, which ended in the defeat of the Mexican army and set the stage for the brief French rule of Mexico.

      As we peek inside, we find ourselves behind masses of French soldiers moving toward the fort and city of Puebla, which is being defended by a smaller Mexican force.

      Diorama de la prise de Puebla (Diorama of the siege of Puebla), 1863, Guerin-Muller et Cie. Hand-colored lithograph. The Getty Research Institute

      05/05/15

  • Flickr