19th-century photographs

Posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Skeletons Carousing in Hell

Stereograph with skeletons and Satan / French, 1860s or 1870s

Skeletons in our closet. More»

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Posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

The Bully Has Left the Room

Untitled / George Seeley
Untitled, about 1903, George Seeley. Platinum print, 19.2 x 24.3 cm. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles, 84.XM.163.3.

While James Ensor is away, Pictorialist photographs will play. More»

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Posted in Art, Photographs, Film, and Video

The Photographs That Helped Save a National Icon

Cathedral Rocks / Watkins
Cathedral Rocks 2600ft., Yosemite, 1861, Carleton Watkins, from the album Photographs of the Yosemite Valley

Carleton Watkins’s powerful images helped convince Congress to save Yosemite. More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Photographs, Film, and Video

Tableaux of the Seasons

The Princess Royal and Prince Arthur as “Summer” in the Tableaux of the Seasons, 1854, Roger Fenton. Royal Collection Trust / Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2014
Royal Collection Trust / Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2014

The royal children enact the seasons in a rare album now on display at the Getty Museum. More»

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      ROSE

      This milky pink boomed into popularity because of a marketing ploy, a mistress, and its ambiguous origins.

      In an effort to compete with the renowned Meissen porcelain factory, the French Sèvres manufactory recruited the glamorous Madame de Pompadour (mistress to King Louis XV). Like a smart sponsorship deal, Sèvres gave her all the porcelain she requested. 

      Introduced in 1757, this rich pink exploded on the scene thanks to favoritism by Madame Pompadour herself. 

      The glaze itself had a weird history. To the Europeans it looked Chinese, and to the Chinese it was European. It was made based on a secret 17th-century glassmaker’s technique, involving mixing glass with flecks of gold.

      For more on colors and their often surprising histories, check out The Brilliant History of Color in Art.

      12/19/14

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