19th-century photographs

Posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Opposites Attract

Tarascon / Charles Tarascon
Tarascon, 1852, Charles Nègre. Waxed paper negative with selectively applied pigment, 9 5/16 x 13 1/16 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 2015.43.9

For 19th-century photographers, the negative was the true work of art. More»

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Posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video, Publications

A Brief History of Animals in Photography

In the Box/Out of the Box / William Wegman
© William Wegman

Animals as photographic subject. More»

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Posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Miscellaneous, Photographs, Film, and Video

This Is How Fun Looked in the 1850s

The Billiard Room, Mentmore House / Roger Fenton
The Billiard Room, Mentmore House, about 1858, Roger Fenton. Albumen silver print, 11 15/16 x 12 1/16 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 2001.27

There’s more to this game of billiards than meets the eye. More»

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Posted in Conservation, Getty Conservation Institute

Conservation Tools: The Handheld Loupe

Getty Conservation Institute project specialist Tram Vo examines a color photographs with a handheld loupe
Getty Conservation Institute project specialist Tram Vo examines color photographs with a handheld loupe to identify the process used to create them.

A handheld magnifying loupe helps conservators study historic photographs with the naked eye More»

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Posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Skeletons Carousing in Hell

Stereograph with skeletons and Satan / French, 1860s or 1870s

Skeletons in our closet. More»

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Posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

The Bully Has Left the Room

Untitled / George Seeley
Untitled, about 1903, George Seeley. Platinum print, 19.2 x 24.3 cm. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles, 84.XM.163.3.

While James Ensor is away, Pictorialist photographs will play. More»

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Posted in Art, Photographs, Film, and Video

The Photographs That Helped Save a National Icon

Cathedral Rocks / Watkins
Cathedral Rocks 2600ft., Yosemite, 1861, Carleton Watkins, from the album Photographs of the Yosemite Valley

Carleton Watkins’s powerful images helped convince Congress to save Yosemite. More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Photographs, Film, and Video

Tableaux of the Seasons

The Princess Royal and Prince Arthur as “Summer” in the Tableaux of the Seasons, 1854, Roger Fenton. Royal Collection Trust / Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2014
Royal Collection Trust / Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2014

The royal children enact the seasons in a rare album now on display at the Getty Museum. More»

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      It’s been 125 years since Van Gogh’s death, today we celebrate his life’s work.


      5 Ways to See Van Gogh’s Irises

      Through observations, visitor conversations, and some sneaky eavesdropping, we’ve compiled the top 5 ways people enjoy this painting.

      1. In a Crowd
        One of the most obvious ways that people see the painting is in a crowd. The gallery is almost always filled, and you might have to wait before you can get up close. The anticipation builds as you start in the back row, and slowly move until you are close enough to see the brushstrokes of Van Gogh’s thick paint.

      2. Online
        David from Colorado said that this was his first visit, but he had already seen the painting online. In addition to being available through the Getty’s Open Content program, the painting is often seen on social media. Just search #irises on Instagram for a taste of the painting’s popularity. 

      3. Alone
        If you arrive right at 10 a.m. when the museum opens, the quiet gallery provides a perfect backdrop to really examine the painting. Solitude and seclusion gives the gallery a sense of intimacy. 

      4. Multiple Times
        Repeat visits can give rise to multiple interpretations. Is it a melancholy or joyous painting? Expressive or depressive? 

      5. Internationally
        Visitors from all across the world viewed this famous Van Gogh. In just one hour you can hear multiple languages—French, Italian, Chinese, Korean, German, and more. Irises seems to rise above cultural boundaries—a Dutch painting inspired by Japanese ukiyo-e prints—to strike an emotional resonance amongst all viewers. 

      What is your favorite lens to view Van Gogh’s work through? 

      07/29/15

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