Aeschylus

Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Villa

Aeschylus’s Persian Queen: An Actor’s Craft

SITI Company rehearses Persians
In rehearsal: Ellen Lauren (foreground) as the queen of Persia; Will Bond (left) as the Messenger

Bringing alive an ancient queen. More»

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Posted in Ancient World, Getty Villa, J. Paul Getty Museum

A Guide to Aeschylus’s “Persians”

Ellen Lauren as Persian Queen Atossa against a backdrop of golden drapery
Play in progress: Ellen Lauren as Persian Queen Atossa against a backdrop of golden drapery. Photo: Sara Radamacher

A theater-goer’s guide to the western world’s oldest play. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Villa, J. Paul Getty Museum

“Persians,” An Ancient Play Remade for the 21st Century

Persians by Aeschylus

Director Anne Bogart on remaking the Western world’s oldest play for the 21st century. More»

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Posted in Ancient World, J. Paul Getty Museum

Prometheus Bound: A God Stands Up for Humans’ Rights

Prometheus LA Mag
Look for these posters around town this summer. The photo shows Ron Cephas Jones performing the remarkable feat of embodying Prometheus while anchored to the 23-foot-tall rotating wheel.

Prometheus gave humans fire, and for that he was punished for all of eternity. His story is brought to life in the Villa’s outdoor theater this fall. More»

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      ROSE

      This milky pink boomed into popularity because of a marketing ploy, a mistress, and its ambiguous origins.

      In an effort to compete with the renowned Meissen porcelain factory, the French Sèvres manufactory recruited the glamorous Madame de Pompadour (mistress to King Louis XV). Like a smart sponsorship deal, Sèvres gave her all the porcelain she requested. 

      Introduced in 1757, this rich pink exploded on the scene thanks to favoritism by Madame Pompadour herself. 

      The glaze itself had a weird history. To the Europeans it looked Chinese, and to the Chinese it was European. It was made based on a secret 17th-century glassmaker’s technique, involving mixing glass with flecks of gold.

      For more on colors and their often surprising histories, check out The Brilliant History of Color in Art.

      12/19/14

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