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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Education, J. Paul Getty Museum

Art Education Isn’t Just for Kids

Untitled life-drawing sketch / Paula Rucker

I’ve always appreciated art, but creating art never seemed like something I could do. Creating a drawing or painting was what talented people did, not me. Professionally, I first became involved in art 10 years ago when I left the… More»

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Posted in Education, Getty Center, J. Paul Getty Museum

Elementary Teachers Share Lessons Inspired by the Getty’s Collection

Discussing student artwork at the Art and Language Arts Culminating Event on April 24, 2010

Today’s school teachers have a wealth of pressures. Not only do they tackle the day-to-day challenges of balancing good teaching with classroom management, but they must also meet the demands of high-stakes standardized testing—and, more recently, face the threat of… More»

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      ROSE

      This milky pink boomed into popularity because of a marketing ploy, a mistress, and its ambiguous origins.

      In an effort to compete with the renowned Meissen porcelain factory, the French Sèvres manufactory recruited the glamorous Madame de Pompadour (mistress to King Louis XV). Like a smart sponsorship deal, Sèvres gave her all the porcelain she requested. 

      Introduced in 1757, this rich pink exploded on the scene thanks to favoritism by Madame Pompadour herself. 

      The glaze itself had a weird history. To the Europeans it looked Chinese, and to the Chinese it was European. It was made based on a secret 17th-century glassmaker’s technique, involving mixing glass with flecks of gold.

      For more on colors and their often surprising histories, check out The Brilliant History of Color in Art.

      12/19/14

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