America Tropical

Posted in Getty Conservation Institute

¡América Tropical! Celebrating a Siqueiros Masterpiece

Asumi on the viewing platform of the América Tropical Interpretive Center.
Asumi on the viewing platform of the América Tropical Interpretive Center.

A few weeks ago, on October 9, the much-anticipated unveiling of the recently conserved mural América Tropical by David Alfaro Siqueiros—one of the great Mexican artists of the 20th century—took place. Los Angeles mayor Antonio Villaraigosa and James Cuno, president… More»

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Posted in Conservation, Getty Conservation Institute

América Tropical Is Reborn on 80th Birthday

América Tropical after conservation in 2012. Mural: © ARS, New York / SOMAAP, Mexico City (c) J. Paul Getty Trust
Artwork: © ARS, New York / SOMAAP, Mexico City. Photo: © J. Paul Getty Trust

Today is América Tropical’s 80th birthday. Artist David Alfaro Siqueiros unveiled his mural to a disapproving Los Angeles on Sunday, October 9, 1932. Eighty years later his mural—L.A.’s mural—is now again publicly accessible. This is, frankly, a day that we… More»

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Posted in Conservation, Getty Conservation Institute, Philanthropy

A Big Lift for América Tropical

The canopy to protect the mural America Tropical, weighing 73,000 lbs and boasting an impressive 90-foot span, was lifted aloft by a construction crane and set into place.

Construction for the shelter, viewing platform, and interpretive center that will surround América Tropical, the only surviving public mural by David Alfaro Siqueiros in the United States still in its original location, is moving forward. The mural, located on the… More»

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      ROSE

      This milky pink boomed into popularity because of a marketing ploy, a mistress, and its ambiguous origins.

      In an effort to compete with the renowned Meissen porcelain factory, the French Sèvres manufactory recruited the glamorous Madame de Pompadour (mistress to King Louis XV). Like a smart sponsorship deal, Sèvres gave her all the porcelain she requested. 

      Introduced in 1757, this rich pink exploded on the scene thanks to favoritism by Madame Pompadour herself. 

      The glaze itself had a weird history. To the Europeans it looked Chinese, and to the Chinese it was European. It was made based on a secret 17th-century glassmaker’s technique, involving mixing glass with flecks of gold.

      For more on colors and their often surprising histories, check out The Brilliant History of Color in Art.

      12/19/14

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