Art & Language Arts

Posted in Behind the Scenes, Education, J. Paul Getty Museum, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

18th-Century Art for the 21st-Century Classroom

Participants at the Getty Museum's Art and Language Arts alumni event - August 11, 2012

Students are often lectured at, asked to receive information and not question what is being said. As a college student, I’ve experienced this first-hand. This summer, I got to explore more creative approaches to learning as part of the team… More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Education, J. Paul Getty Museum

Art Education Isn’t Just for Kids

Untitled life-drawing sketch / Paula Rucker

I’ve always appreciated art, but creating art never seemed like something I could do. Creating a drawing or painting was what talented people did, not me. Professionally, I first became involved in art 10 years ago when I left the… More»

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Posted in Education, Getty Center, J. Paul Getty Museum

Elementary Teachers Share Lessons Inspired by the Getty’s Collection

Discussing student artwork at the Art and Language Arts Culminating Event on April 24, 2010

Today’s school teachers have a wealth of pressures. Not only do they tackle the day-to-day challenges of balancing good teaching with classroom management, but they must also meet the demands of high-stakes standardized testing—and, more recently, face the threat of… More»

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      #ProvenancePeek: June 30

      Every art object has a story—not only of how it was made, but of how it changed hands over time until it found its current home. That story is provenance.

      This portrait of actress Antonia Zárate by Goya is now part of the collection of the National Gallery of Ireland. The records of famed art dealer M. Knoedler & Co. at the Getty Research Institute reveal its recent provenance: the painting was sold by Knoedler on June 30, 1910, to financier Otto Beit. Part of his collection, including this painting, was later donated to the National Gallery of Ireland in Dublin. To this day the Gallery showcases some of its greatest masterpieces in the Beit Wing. This spread from a digitized Knoedler stock book records the transaction (second entry from top).

      M. Knoedler was one of the most influential dealers in the history of art. He sold European paintings to collectors (such as Henry Clay Frick, the Vanderbilts, and Andrew Mellon) whose collections formed the genesis of great museums such as the National Gallery of Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Frick Collection, the Huntington, and more. Knoedler’s stock books have recently been digitized and transformed into a searchable database, which anyone can query for free.

      Portrait of Doña Antonia Zárate, ca. 1805–06, José de Goya y Lucientes. Beit Collection, National Gallery of Ireland. Image courtesy of the National Gallery of Ireland.

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      #ProvenancePeek is a monthly series by research assistant Kelly Davis peeking into #onthisday provenance finds from the M. Knoedler & Co. archives at the Getty Research Institute.

      06/30/15

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