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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Education, J. Paul Getty Museum, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

18th-Century Art for the 21st-Century Classroom

Participants at the Getty Museum's Art and Language Arts alumni event - August 11, 2012

Students are often lectured at, asked to receive information and not question what is being said. As a college student, I’ve experienced this first-hand. This summer, I got to explore more creative approaches to learning as part of the team… More»

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Posted in Education, J. Paul Getty Museum

Invitation of the Week: Collage Meet-Up on October 29

Analia Saban and Claire de Dobay Rifelj at a collage workshop on October 19, 2011

Update! See our Flickr set from the meet-up here! We’re doing something different for our Question of the Week series on the Iris this month: an invitation of the week. Join us at the Getty Center on Saturday, October 29,… More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, J. Paul Getty Trust

The Museum of Hidden Talents

Stilwalking at the Getty Underground opening

One of the coolest parts about working at the Getty is discovering the many artistic talents of your coworkers—the curator who bakes professional-quality wedding cakes, the project manager who hulas, the software engineer who writes environmental poetry. Everyone is just… More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Education, Getty Villa

Career Profile: Erin Branham, Education Specialist

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What is your job at the Getty? I’m an education specialist for family programs. Since I came to the Getty Villa in 2008, I’ve been building programs that appeal to parents and kids. There’s also a healthy new education section… More»

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Posted in Education, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

Art Stops: A Fanciful Chandelier Ride

Sydney Blum's "King-o-labra"

We were about to go see gallery teacher Audrey Chan’s favorite artwork in the whole museum. “What are the some of the rules we need to follow in the galleries?” she asked the 15 parents and children who crowded around… More»

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      It’s been 125 years since Van Gogh’s death, today we celebrate his life’s work.


      5 Ways to See Van Gogh’s Irises

      Through observations, visitor conversations, and some sneaky eavesdropping, we’ve compiled the top 5 ways people enjoy this painting.

      1. In a Crowd
        One of the most obvious ways that people see the painting is in a crowd. The gallery is almost always filled, and you might have to wait before you can get up close. The anticipation builds as you start in the back row, and slowly move until you are close enough to see the brushstrokes of Van Gogh’s thick paint.

      2. Online
        David from Colorado said that this was his first visit, but he had already seen the painting online. In addition to being available through the Getty’s Open Content program, the painting is often seen on social media. Just search #irises on Instagram for a taste of the painting’s popularity. 

      3. Alone
        If you arrive right at 10 a.m. when the museum opens, the quiet gallery provides a perfect backdrop to really examine the painting. Solitude and seclusion gives the gallery a sense of intimacy. 

      4. Multiple Times
        Repeat visits can give rise to multiple interpretations. Is it a melancholy or joyous painting? Expressive or depressive? 

      5. Internationally
        Visitors from all across the world viewed this famous Van Gogh. In just one hour I heard multiple languages—French, Italian, Chinese, Korean, German, and more. Irises seems to rise above cultural boundaries—a Dutch painting inspired by Japanese ukiyo-e prints—to strike an emotional resonance amongst all viewers. 

      What is your favorite lens to view Van Gogh’s work through? 

      07/29/15

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