artists

Posted in Art, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

Sculpting Gravity

Floating Curvilinear Arc / Geyer and McMillin
Photo © Don Milici, courtesy Pasadena Museum of California Art

Making visible the earth’s elegance, through art. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, J. Paul Getty Museum

Musicians and Artists Take Over the Getty for This Summer’s Friday Flights

Friday Flights at the Getty Center - summer 2014

Music nights that make you think: Friday Flights launches May 30. More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Paintings

Is That An Art Exhibition In Your Ear?

Portraits: An Exhibition in Tif Sigfrids' Ear
Can you find the exhibit? Tif Sigfrids with L.A.'s smallest gallery show, Portraits: An Exhibition in Tif Sigfrids' Ear.

L.A.’s smallest gallery show is currently taking place inside a human ear. More»

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Posted in Art

Yes, Art Really Is Hard Work

Grave Relief of a Silversmith / Roman
Grave Relief of Publius Curtilius Agatus, Silversmith, A.D. 1–25, Roman. Marble, 31 7/16 x 23 1/16 x 12 1/2 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 96.AA.40. Bruce White Photography

In honor of Labor Day, a tribute to the hard work of artists throughout the centuries. More»

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Posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, Education, J. Paul Getty Museum

Artists Reinventing the Museum, A Google Art Talk with Sam Durant

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Artists are helping museums transform themselves for the 21st century. A conversation. More»

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Posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, J. Paul Getty Museum, Voices

Getty Voices: What #isamuseum?

Screen Shot 2013-06-10 at 8.22.53 AM

“The project emerged through extended dialogue with members of the Getty Museum’s Education Department, and it was certainly a collaboration.” More»

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Posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, Paintings

What Makes an Artist Great? Curator Scott Schaefer on Vermeer

Woman in Blue Reading a Letter / Johannes Vermeer as installed at the Getty Center
Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam. On loan from the City of Amsterdam (A. van der Hoop Bequest)

Johannes Vermeer is a beloved artist. Is he also a great one? More»

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Posted in Education, J. Paul Getty Museum

What Can We Learn from Artists’ Projects in Museums?

Giant Hand at the Hammer Museum
Machine Project's humorous "Giant Hand" installation at the Hammer Museum tackles wayfinding through humor. Photo courtesy of the Machine Project

More and more museums are inviting artists to go beyond hanging their art on their walls to create engaging visitor experiences inside the museum. At a panel discussion earlier this week, we invited curators, educators, and artists to talk about… More»

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Posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, Getty Research Institute, Paintings

Treasures from the Vault: Sylvia Sleigh and Lawrence Alloway, Mutual Muses

The Turkish Bath / Sylvia Sleigh
© Estate of Sylvia Sleigh

Intimate relationships visualized: the work and love of Sylvia Sleigh and Lawrence Alloway. More»

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Posted in Getty Research Institute, Paintings

Vitaly Komar: Exploring the Lines Between Us

Where is the Line Between Us?, Komad and Melamid, and Douglas Davis

Komar and Melamid created canvases to represent the most wanted (and unwanted) visual imagery for different countries. The results were telling, and hilarious. More»

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      All Hail Tiberius, Least Media-Savvy of the Roman Emperors

      Tiberius was proclaimed Roman emperor on September 17 in AD 14, exactly 2,000 years ago.

      He was also a bit idiosyncratic. “He was the least media-savvy emperor you could imagine,” says curator David Saunders, who has been in charge of this bronze portrait of Tiberius which leaves us on September 22. He point to this description found in the writings of Cassius Dio:

      Tiberius was a patrician of good education, but he had a most peculiar nature. He never let what he desired appear in his conversation, and what he said he wanted he usually did not desire at all. On the contrary, his words indicated the exact opposite of his real purpose; he denied all interest in what he longed for, and urged the claims of what he hated. He would exhibit anger over matters that were far from arousing his wrath, and make a show of affability where he was most vexed…In short, he thought it bad policy for the sovereign to reveal his thoughts; this was often the cause, he said, of great failures, whereas by the opposite course, far more and greater successes were attained.

      Moreover, David tells us, “Tiberius’s accession itself was a farrago: Tiberius sort-of feigning reluctance, the Senate bullying him, he being all, ‘Well, if-I-have-to,’ and in the end—according to Suetonius—saying he’ll do it as long as he can retire.”

      Suetonius is full of great, albeit spurious, anecdotes about poor old Tiberius, David reports. “When someone addressed him as ‘My Lord,’ it is said, Tiberius gave warning that no such insult should ever again be thrown at him.”

      Happy accession, My Lord!

      Portrait Head of Tiberius (“The Lansdowne Tiberius”), early 1st century A.D., Roman. The J. Paul Getty Museum

      Statue of Tiberius (detail), Roman, A.D. 37, Soprintendenza Speciale per i Beni Archeologici di Napoli e Pompei – Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Napoli, Laboratorio di Conservazione e Restauro. Currently on view at the Getty Villa following conservation and study.

      09/17/14

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