Attic pottery

Posted in Ancient World, Antiquities

Is That Available as an e-Book? Scrolling through an Ancient Text

Attic Red-Figure Cup Fragment
Attic Red-Figure Cup Fragment (detail); Akestorides Painter, Greek (Attic), active about 470 - 450 B.C.; Athens, Greece, Europe; about 470 - 450 B.C.; Terracotta; Object (greatest extent): 6.8 cm (2 11/16 in.); 86.AE.324

An ancient depiction of a classroom and the mysterious marked letters on a scroll; but what do these letters mean? More»

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Posted in Antiquities, Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Getty Conservation Institute, J. Paul Getty Museum, Research, Voices

Getty Voices: Attic Pots and Atomic Particles

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How did the ancient Greeks make their characteristic red-and-black pottery? Modern science may finally yield the answer. More»

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      Touched by an angel. Or demon.

      The 16th-century alchemist and mathematician John Dee spent years documenting his conversations with what he believed to be angels.

      40 years after his death, the scholar Méric Causabon published Dee’s records, arguing that Dee had been talking to evil spirits all along. So what are you reading this weekend? 

      Title page from “A True and Faithful Relation …,” 1659, Méric Causabon. Getty Research Institute.

      08/31/14

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