Aztec Pantheon

Posted in Architecture and Design, Behind the Scenes, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Villa

Career Profile: Davina Wolter, Designer

Davina Wolter, setting up The Belles Heures of the Duke of Berry exhibition.

What do you do at the Getty? I’m a designer. My work includes graphics, or 2-D design, as well as 3-D design-such as furniture, interiors, and architectural drawing. Our department, Design, is unique for a cultural institution because we create… More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Villa

Career Profile: Marcus Adams, Antiquities Preparator

marcus_adams

This is the second in our series of Q&As on arts careers. We return from conservation in the field to discuss the behind-the-scenes work of a preparator. What do you do at the Getty? I’m a preparator—I set up and… More»

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Posted in Education, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Villa

Cook Your Own Aztec Feast

Guacamole with a dash of lime
Guacamole with a dash of lime

Mexican cooking as we know and love it in the U.S.—moles, carne asada, burritos, cafe con leche, loads of melty cheese—would have been unrecognizable to the Aztecs. They didn’t have cows, pigs, sugar, cheese, butter, cinnamon, or wheat. They did,… More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Education, Getty Conservation Institute, Getty Villa

What’s Simmering in That Beaker? Understanding Ancient Technology by Manufacturing Pigments

Elizabeth Drolet filters mixtures of dye extracted from madder roots with different inorganic materials, such as alum, lye or chalk. The different inorganic materials used produce different shades of red.
Elizabeth Drolet filters mixtures of dye extracted from madder roots with different inorganic materials, such as alum, lye or chalk. The different inorganic materials used produce different shades of red.

Powdered saffron, simmering roots, crushed leaves…no, it’s not what’s cooking in the kitchen, but what’s been cooking at the Getty Villa this quarter for the UCLA/Getty Master’s Program in the Conservation of Archaeological and Ethnographic Materials. As part of a… More»

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Posted in Antiquities, Behind the Scenes, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Villa

Curating The Aztec Pantheon

Tzitzimitl (Demon), Aztec, 1440–69, found near the Templo Mayor, Mexico City. Terracotta, stucco, and pigment, 176 x 80 x 50 cm. Museo del Templo Mayor, Mexico City. CONACULTA-INAH-MEX © foto zabé. Reproduction authorized by the National Institute of Anthropology and History
Tzitzimitl (Demon), Aztec, 1440–69, found near the Templo Mayor, Mexico City. Terracotta, stucco, and pigment, 176 x 80 x 50 cm. Museo del Templo Mayor, Mexico City. CONACULTA-INAH-MEX © foto zabé. Reproduction authorized by the National Institute of Anthropology and History

The premise of The Aztec Pantheon and the Art of Empire is a unique one: that just as classical antiquity colored Spanish perceptions of Mesoamerica, the experience of Aztec civilization piqued curiosity about Renaissance Europe’s own ancient heritage. As curators,… More»

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Posted in Antiquities, Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Villa

How Do You Move an Aztec Deity? Very Carefully!

Installing The Aztec Pantheon and the Art of Empire

Objects you see in the galleries at the Getty Villa, whether monumental or miniature, weighing a few ounces or several tons, all require careful and complicated work to install. As a conservation mount maker, I’ve just finished working with my… More»

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      A courtly strut along a winding path. 

      The decorated border reveals perhaps a C, an X, and a Y. It’s difficult to make out, but these initials likely hold the key to the manuscript’s unknown patron.

      #NowOnView in the new rotation of Chivalry in the Middle Ages

      Young Men and Women Outdoors, about 1460 - 1470, French. J. Paul Getty Museum.

      09/22/14

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