Canterbury

Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Manuscripts and Books

They That Go Down To The Sea In Ships

The Calling of Saints Peter and Andrew / Master of the Brussels Initials
The Calling of Saints Peter and Andrew, about 1389–1404, Master of the Brussels Initials. Tempera colors, gold leaf, gold paint, and ink on parchment, 13 x 9 7/16 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Ms. 34, fol. 172

A reflection on the Feast of Saint Andrew, celebrated at Canterbury Cathedral. More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Manuscripts and Books, Voices

Getty Voices: Living with the St. Albans Psalter

Conservator's hands holding the parchment of the St. Albans Psalter
Artwork: Dombibliothek Hildesheim. Photo: Peter Kidd

Studying a precious manuscript, page by page, illumination by illumination. More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations

The Fearless Modernity of Canterbury Stained Glass

Leonie Seliger and Laura Atkinson
Leonie Seliger and Laura Atkinson, glass conservators from Canterbury Cathedral!

What does Jackson Pollock have to do with medieval stained glass? Leonie Seliger explains. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Voices

Getty Voices: Designing Canterbury and St. Albans

The digital rendering of the installation of the pieces.
The digital rendering of the installation of the pieces.

Perfectly angled lecterns and a massive glass wall presented plenty of creative challenges for the designers of the exhibition “Canterbury and St. Albans.” More»

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      Masked Harlequin, the commedia dell’arte’s leading man, lures an innocent, elegantly dressed young lady into the world of prostitution. She’s caught the eye of a displeased young man, dressed in dapper clothes. They stand out in this scene of costumed characters in exaggerated clothing. 

      Gillot’s light, quick brushstrokes mimics the satirical subject and lighthearted portrayal of human folly.

      Fashion Fridays explores art, history, and costume inspired by the exhibition Rococo to Revolution #NowOnView

      Scene from the Italian Comedy (recto), about 1700, Claude Gillot. The J. Paul Getty Museum

      07/25/14

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