Canterbury

Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Foundation, J. Paul Getty Museum

Grad Intern Diary: Rheagan Martin

Rheagan Martin / Graduate Intern

A year of manuscripts, coins, and English weather. More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Manuscripts and Books

They That Go Down To The Sea In Ships

The Calling of Saints Peter and Andrew / Master of the Brussels Initials
The Calling of Saints Peter and Andrew, about 1389–1404, Master of the Brussels Initials. Tempera colors, gold leaf, gold paint, and ink on parchment, 13 x 9 7/16 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Ms. 34, fol. 172

A reflection on the Feast of Saint Andrew, celebrated at Canterbury Cathedral. More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Manuscripts and Books, Voices

Getty Voices: Living with the St. Albans Psalter

Conservator's hands holding the parchment of the St. Albans Psalter
Artwork: Dombibliothek Hildesheim. Photo: Peter Kidd

Studying a precious manuscript, page by page, illumination by illumination. More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations

The Fearless Modernity of Canterbury Stained Glass

Leonie Seliger and Laura Atkinson
Leonie Seliger and Laura Atkinson, glass conservators from Canterbury Cathedral!

What does Jackson Pollock have to do with medieval stained glass? Leonie Seliger explains. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Voices

Getty Voices: Designing Canterbury and St. Albans

The digital rendering of the installation of the pieces.
The digital rendering of the installation of the pieces.

Perfectly angled lecterns and a massive glass wall presented plenty of creative challenges for the designers of the exhibition “Canterbury and St. Albans.” More»

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      #ThyCaptionBe: Warnings to the Rich & Powerful

      You captioned this detail. And we’re revealing the full story now.

      It would be awesome if this was Medieval hangman, or a really awkward frat party, but it’s actually the result of a one-letter swap gone wrong in a book about the fates of the rich. 

      Here’s the full story:

      You sometimes regret what pops out unexpectedly when you open your mouth, but in this case, even the fish must have been quite surprised when a wooly lamb burst forth. 

      The stories in this text by Giovanni Boccaccio warn of the terrible fate that often awaits the rich and powerful. He uses here the example of King Polycrates, who tossed a ring into a river, hoping for good luck, and found it later in the mouth of a fish. 

      Someone got confused, though, and instead of a ring (in French, annel), what came out instead was a lamb (agnel). Apparently, neither the ring nor the lamb worked because the king was later hanged (background).

      #ThyCaptionBe is a celebration of modern interpretations of medieval aesthetics. You guess what the heck is going on, then we myth-bust.

      08/31/15

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