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Posted in Antiquities, Behind the Scenes, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Villa

Curating The Aztec Pantheon

Tzitzimitl (Demon), Aztec, 1440–69, found near the Templo Mayor, Mexico City. Terracotta, stucco, and pigment, 176 x 80 x 50 cm. Museo del Templo Mayor, Mexico City. CONACULTA-INAH-MEX © foto zabé. Reproduction authorized by the National Institute of Anthropology and History
Tzitzimitl (Demon), Aztec, 1440–69, found near the Templo Mayor, Mexico City. Terracotta, stucco, and pigment, 176 x 80 x 50 cm. Museo del Templo Mayor, Mexico City. CONACULTA-INAH-MEX © foto zabé. Reproduction authorized by the National Institute of Anthropology and History

The premise of The Aztec Pantheon and the Art of Empire is a unique one: that just as classical antiquity colored Spanish perceptions of Mesoamerica, the experience of Aztec civilization piqued curiosity about Renaissance Europe’s own ancient heritage. As curators,… More»

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Posted in Antiquities, Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Villa

How Do You Move an Aztec Deity? Very Carefully!

Installing The Aztec Pantheon and the Art of Empire

Objects you see in the galleries at the Getty Villa, whether monumental or miniature, weighing a few ounces or several tons, all require careful and complicated work to install. As a conservation mount maker, I’ve just finished working with my… More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

The Thrills (and Terrors) of Installing an Exhibition

Installing Leonardo and the Art of Sculpture
Chain in hand, I help out during the heavy lifting.

Wednesday, March 17, 9:50 a.m. That’s it. I’ve just walked the last courier to the South Gate shuttle point and said good-bye, and am going back to the museum. There’s a delicious smell coming from the wisteria, and the sky… More»

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      Happy 4th of July!

      Cheeky children peeking out from behind this 48-star American flag. This was taken in New York between 1890 and 1900 in the studio of a photographer named DeYoung.

      07/04/15

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