catalogs

Posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, Getty Research Institute, Research

Treasures from the Vault: Harald Szeemann, From Vision to Nail

Harald Szeemann during the installation of documenta 5 in Kassel, Germany, 1972 / Balthasar Burkhard
Harald Szeemann during the installation of documenta 5 in Kassel, Germany, 1972. Photo by Balthasar Burkhard. The Getty Research Institute, Harald Szeemann papers, 1892–2010

A five-person team at the Research Institute has finished cataloging Harald Szeemann’s monumental Project Files. More»

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Posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, Getty Research Institute, Paintings, Research

Life Before eBay: British Art Auctions at the End of the 18th Century

britishsales_featured

A major new project traces the rise of the British art market in the late 1700s. More»

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Posted in Architecture and Design, Art, Getty Research Institute

Treasures from the Vault: Ray Kappe, Green Architecture Pioneer and SCI-ARC Founder

Architectural rendering of the Kappe residence. Ray Kappe papers, drawings, and models. The Getty Research Institute, 2008.M.36
Architectural rendering of the Kappe residence. Pacific Palisades, California. Ray Kappe, architect. Ray Kappe papers. Gift of Ray Kappe. The Getty Research Institute, 2008.M.36

Researchers interested in studying post-World War II architecture in Southern California will be excited to learn that a new archive is now fully catalogued and available for study: the Ray Kappe papers. The collection, part of the Getty Research Institute’s… More»

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Posted in Getty Foundation, Research

Looking With New Eyes at Scholarly Art Catalogues

SFMOMA, one of the participants in the OSCI initiative, has chosen to focus on Robert Rauschenberg, given their significant holdings of his work, and their team is gathering together curatorial essays, conservation documentation, audio interviews and related materials in a single online resource. Image: Collection (formerly Untitled), Robert Rauschenberg, 1954, oil, paper, fabric, wood, and metal on canvas, SFMOMA
SFMOMA, one of the participants in the OSCI initiative, has chosen to focus on Robert Rauschenberg, given their significant holdings of his work, and their team is gathering together curatorial essays, conservation documentation, audio interviews and related materials in a single online resource. Image: Collection (formerly Untitled), Robert Rauschenberg, 1954, oil, paper, fabric, wood, and metal on canvas, SFMOMA

The scholarly catalogue has long been a critical part of a museum’s mission, providing authoritative information about collection objects for scholars, students, and the general public. Richly illustrated and often based on years of painstaking research, print catalogues form one… More»

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      All Hail Tiberius, Least Media-Savvy of the Roman Emperors

      Tiberius was proclaimed Roman emperor on September 17 in AD 14, exactly 2,000 years ago.

      He was also a bit wacko. “He was the least media-savvy emperor you could imagine,” says curator David Saunders, who has been in charge of this bronze portrait of Tiberius which leaves us on September 22. He point to this description found in the writings of Cassius Dio:

      Tiberius was a patrician of good education, but he had a most peculiar nature. He never let what he desired appear in his conversation, and what he said he wanted he usually did not desire at all. On the contrary, his words indicated the exact opposite of his real purpose; he denied all interest in what he longed for, and urged the claims of what he hated. He would exhibit anger over matters that were far from arousing his wrath, and make a show of affability where he was most vexed…In short, he thought it bad policy for the sovereign to reveal his thoughts; this was often the cause, he said, of great failures, whereas by the opposite course, far more and greater successes were attained.

      Moreover, David tells us, “Tiberius’s accession itself was a farrago: Tiberius sort-of feigning reluctance, the Senate bullying him, he being all, ‘Well, if-I-have-to,’ and in the end—according to Suetonius—saying he’ll do it as long as he can retire.”

      Suetonius is full of great, albeit spurious, anecdotes about poor old Tiberius, David reports. “When someone addressed him as ‘My Lord,’ it is said, Tiberius gave warning that no such insult should ever again be thrown at him.”

      Happy accession, My Lord!

      Portrait Head of Tiberius (“The Lansdowne Tiberius”), early 1st century A.D., Roman. The J. Paul Getty Museum

      Statue of Tiberius (detail), Roman, A.D. 37, Soprintendenza Speciale per i Beni Archeologici di Napoli e Pompei – Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Napoli, Laboratorio di Conservazione e Restauro. Currently on view at the Getty Villa following conservation and study.

      09/17/14

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