ceramics

Posted in Ancient World, Art, Education, Getty Villa

Proclamations in Clay

4_workshop2

Make your own regal proclamation in rolled clay with these tips from artist Anna Mayer. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, J. Paul Getty Museum

In Studio: John Mason

Artist John Mason in his studio, January 8, 2012

On January 8 sculptor John Mason opened his studio and shared insights into his creative process with us and a group of eager participants. The event was part of “In Studio,” a program we in the Museum’s Education Department organized… More»

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Posted in Antiquities, Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Getty Villa, J. Paul Getty Museum

Looking at Apulian Vases in a New Light

Loutrophoros / Greek, 300s B.C.

Since 2008, the antiquities conservation and curatorial departments at the J. Paul Getty Museum have been working with colleagues at the Antikensammlung in Berlin to study and conserve a group of South Italian (Apulian) vases dating to the 4th century… More»

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Posted in Exhibitions and Installations, Paintings, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

It Happened in L.A.: Artists Turn to Zen

Little Big Horn / Peter Voulkos

Artists’ studios aren’t generally thought of as meditative places. The stereotype is one of disarray—an image comes to mind of paintbrushes, sculpting tools, or other instruments of the trade strewn about a room, as if to signal an unruly creative… More»

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      everyartisthasabday:

      Botticelli’s Mystical Nativity was hidden for many centuries. Once found, it earned its name from both the unusual Nativity symbolism and Greek inscription at the top.

      Boticelli believed he was living through the Tribulation, which is clear in the mysterious inscription:

      This picture, at the end of the year 1500, in the troubles of Italy, I Alessandro, in the half-time after the time, painted, according to the eleventh chapter of Saint John, in the second woe of the Apocalypse, during the release of the devil for three-and-a-half years; then he shall be bound in the twelfth chapter and we shall see [him buried] as in this picture.

      It is the only surviving work with his signature.

      03/02/15

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