Charles Le Brun

Posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, Getty Research Institute, Research

Recovering Lost History in Le Brun’s Prints

Crossing of the Granicus, Gérard Audran after Charles Le Brun, 1672. The Getty Research Institute, 2003.PR.33

In 2003 the Getty Research Institute acquired hundreds of 17th-century French prints that had been in the collection of a European noble family. This family had systematically, over hundreds of years, amassed an incredibly important collection of Old Master prints,… More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Research Institute

The Rise and Fall of Charles Le Brun: Q&A with Louis Marchesano

louis_marchesano_2

I talked to Louis Marchesano, curator of prints and drawings at the Getty Research Institute, about the exhibition Printing the Grand Manner: Charles Le Brun and Monumental Prints in the Age of Louis XIV, now on view at the GRI—how… More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Research Institute

Royal Propaganda, from Prints to Pixels

Queens of Persia at the Feet of Alexander (detail), Gérard Edelink after Charles Le Brun, ca. 1675

Spin control—it’s been around for centuries. Louis XIV, king of France from 1660 to 1715, was a master at it, using art—especially the work of his court painter, Charles Le Brun—to create and perpetuate a glorified image of his monarchy…. More»

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      Your Voice Matters

      StoryCorps is recording 18 conversations at the Getty Center on March 26, 27, and 28 on the theme of play. This {awesome} oral history project provides people of all backgrounds and beliefs with the opportunity to record, share, and preserve the stories of our lives. 

      If you’re in L.A. on these days and have a friend or family member who wants to do it too, you can apply to participate. It’s free, and your recording will go into the Library of Congress.

      Because we only have 18 time slots, not everyone can participate…but we want to hear from you if you do!

      Participate in StoryCorps at the Getty

      03/05/15

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