China

Posted in Art, Education, Getty Foundation, Philanthropy

Connecting the Art Historical Dots

Connecting Art Histories participants studying frescoes in the Casa Vasari palace in Florence, Italy. © J. Paul Getty Trust
Connecting Art Histories participants studying frescoes in the Casa Vasari palace in Florence, Italy.

A Getty Foundation initiative is expanding the frontiers of art history by bringing scholars together from around the globe. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Research Institute

What Is 砂金石? The Art & Architecture Thesaurus Publishes Chinese Terms

Necklace with aventurine
Necklace featuring 砂金石 (shā jīn shí), also known as venturina and aventurien

The big news in the Getty Vocabulary Program is that around 3,150 records in the Art & Architecture Thesaurus with one or more Chinese-language equivalent terms, plus descriptive notes and bibliographic citations in Chinese, are now published online. The Art… More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Pointing East, Thinking West: Felice Beato’s Photographic View

Interior of the Sikh Temple with Marble Mosaic, Felice Beato (British, born Italy, 1832–1909), negative, 1858; print 1862. Printed by Henry Hering. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 84.XM.475.7

Whether he planted his tripod in India, China, Japan, Korea, or Burma, the Italian-born photographer Felice Beato always portrayed a country’s culture through a distinctly Western lens. The Museum’s current exhibition of his work, Felice Beato: A Photographer on the… More»

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Posted in Education, Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Zhang Huan: Beyond the Body

Family Tree / Zhang Huan

The body, being, and humanness are Zhang Huan’s primary mediums and subjects. More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Research Institute, Photographs, Film, and Video

Brush and Shutter: When Chinese Painters Became Photographers

Portrait of Li Hongzhang in Tianjin, 1878, Liang Shitai (also known as See Tay) (Chinese, active in Hong Kong, Shanghai, and Tianjin, 1870s–1880s), albumen silver print. The Getty Research Institute, 2006.R.1.4
Portrait of Li Hongzhang in Tianjin / Liang Shitai (also known as See Tay)

The new exhibition Brush & Shutter: Early Photography in China uses photographs, along with a few paintings and other artistic media, to tell a largely unknown story about China. In the second half of the 19th century, when China was… More»

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      ROSE

      This milky pink boomed into popularity because of a marketing ploy, a mistress, and its ambiguous origins.

      In an effort to compete with the renowned Meissen porcelain factory, the French Sèvres manufactory recruited the glamorous Madame de Pompadour (mistress to King Louis XV). Like a smart sponsorship deal, Sèvres gave her all the porcelain she requested. 

      Introduced in 1757, this rich pink exploded on the scene thanks to favoritism by Madame Pompadour herself. 

      The glaze itself had a weird history. To the Europeans it looked Chinese, and to the Chinese it was European. It was made based on a secret 17th-century glassmaker’s technique, involving mixing glass with flecks of gold.

      For more on colors and their often surprising histories, check out The Brilliant History of Color in Art.

      12/19/14

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