community service

Posted in Behind the Scenes, Philanthropy

Creativity Blooms at Inner-City Arts on L.A.’s Skid Row

Inner-City Arts
Inner-City Arts is a haven of safety and creativity in the heart of L.A.'s Skid Row.

Getty staff team up to give back to Inner-City arts, a pearl of arts education in the chaos of L.A.’s concrete jungle. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, J. Paul Getty Trust

First Annual Day of Service Is a Hit

Jim Cuno at the Getty's Day of Service, March 11, 2013

Reflections on the Getty’s first annual Day of Service. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes

Getty Staff Climbs to New Heights—In 1,377 Steps

2011 Getty Community Service team at the American Lung Assocation's Fight for Air Climb

Update—We’re gearing up for the 2013 Fight for Air Climb, scheduled for April 6. More info and how to join us here. The Getty has an active Community Service Team of staff and volunteers who do wonderful things for our… More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Center

VA to the Getty, by Way of the Shuttle

Carrie Brandlin with the mision statement of the VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System

In 2007 the Getty Security department was approached by the VA (Veterans Affairs) to see if we could arrange a visit to the Getty Center for some of the veterans at their facility off Sepulveda Boulevard at Constitution Avenue. Of… More»

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      gettypubs:

      ULTRAMARINE

      The vibrant blue in the above image of Saint George and the Dragon (Master of Buillebert de Mets, about 1450-55) still looks remarkably vivid to modern eyes, but to medieval readers it wouldn’t have just looked eye-catching—it would have looked expensive. Why? Because this particular blue pigment (ultramarine) required lapis lazuli, like the carved stone above (Roman, second century AD). For centuries all lapis was sourced from a single mountain range in Afghanistan, meaning that a French medieval manuscript with the color required a lot of financial resources! 

      For more on ultramarine and other shades of blue, check out The Brilliant History of Color in Art.

      Both objects are from the collection of the J. Paul Getty Museum.

      11/24/14

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