conservation

Posted in Behind the Scenes, J. Paul Getty Museum, Prints and Drawings

Behind the Scenes of a Special Exhibition at the Getty

Maxime LaLanne / Castle Overlooking a River
Gift of Richard A. Simms.

How a drawings show takes shape. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Conservation, J. Paul Getty Museum

Cleaning 700 Square Feet of Precious Tapestry

Weavers conserve a tapestry at the Gobelins Manufactory
Photo courtesy of the Gobelins Manufactory

Tapestries once owned by Louis XIV receive a high-tech cleaning. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

Revitalizing Barbara Hepworth’s Figure for Landscape

Figure 3: Figure for Landscape, 1960, Barbara Hepworth. Bronze. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Gift of Fran and Ray Stark, 2005.108. © Bowness. After treatment on the Fran and Ray Sculpture Terrace.
Figure 3: Figure for Landscape, 1960, Barbara Hepworth. Bronze. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Gift of Fran and Ray Stark, 2005.108. © Bowness. After treatment on the Fran and Ray Sculpture Terrace.

A behind-the-scenes look at restoring Barbara Hepworth’s 1960 sculpture “Figure for Landscape.” More»

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Posted in Art, Getty Conservation Institute

Artist William Pope.L on Humor, Race, and God

Obi Sunt (Production Image from the making of Obi Sunt), 2015, William Pope.L. Courtesy of the Artist © Pope.L
Obi Sunt (Production Image from the making of Obi Sunt), 2015, William Pope.L. Courtesy of the Artist © Pope.L

Pope.L takes our questions about his practice and the future of his work. More»

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Posted in Art, Getty Conservation Institute, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

Artist Grimanesa Amorós on the Value of Public Art

The Mirror Connection | Beijing, China
© Grimanesa Amorós

A chat with the sculptor and installation artist. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

Look Deep Inside a French Bronze Sculpture

Detail of Boreas Abducting Orithyia

Conservators use X-rays and a videoscope to unlock the secrets of a bronze sculpture. More»

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Posted in Ancient World, Antiquities, Conservation

Bronze Patinas, Noble and Vile

Detail of patina on a Roman bronze statue of Cupid
Statue of the Infant Cupid (detail), Roman, A.D. 1–50, Roman. Bronze with silver and copper, 25 3/16 in. high. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 96.AB.53

They’re all made from the same stuff, so why do bronze statues come in so many different colors? More»

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Posted in Getty Conservation Institute, J. Paul Getty Museum, Paintings

A Hidden Rembrandt Has Been Digitally Reconstructed in Color

Tentative color reconstruction of the hidden portrait under An Old Man in Military Costume
Tentative color reconstruction of the hidden portrait under An Old Man in Military Costume

A hidden Rembrandt is revealed. More»

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Posted in Art, Getty Foundation, Philanthropy

A Look Back at the Fund for New Orleans, 10 Years after Hurricane Katrina

Southern University of New Orleans (SUNO) Graduate Student Erika Witt holds her favorite mask in the university’s African Art Collection in preparation for a 2015 exhibition on campus as part of her graduate degree in Museum Studies. Photo: Master of Arts in Museums Studies Program, Center for African and African American Studies, SUNO
Southern University of New Orleans (SUNO) Graduate Student Erika Witt holds her favorite mask in the university’s African Art Collection in preparation for a 2015 exhibition on campus as part of her graduate degree in Museum Studies. Photo: Master of Arts in Museums Studies Program, Center for African and African American Studies, SUNO

How are cultural organizations faring, 10 years after the Katrina disaster? More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Foundation, Paintings

How I Look at Art as a Conservator

Sara Mateu examines the reverse of a panel painting
Sara Mateu examines the reverse of a panel painting.

What is it like to be a panel paintings conservator? More»

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      A Chat with Photographer Tomoko Sawada

      A conversation about Japanese matchmaking traditions, self-portraiture, clothes, and identity.

      When did you start photographing yourself?
      I began making self-portraits when I was 19. It was an assignment for a photography class. I can’t even explain in Japanese why I liked them so much. It was instinctual. It’s as if I knew that this was going to be my style, that this is what I wanted to do. And I’m still doing it because I love the self-portrait, but I don’t know why. 

      What themes are you exploring in your work?
      I’m interested in the relationship between inside and outside. If you wear a sexy dress or if you wear kids clothes or casual clothes, people treat you differently. Even though you are you no matter what you wear. It’s that relationship that makes me think. 

      My new work is from when I was living in New York. When I was in New York, people didn’t think I was Japanese. Sometimes they thought I was Korean or Chines or Mongolian. Even Singaporean. It was funny, when I would go to the Japanese market, they would speak to me in English. When I went to the Korean market, they would speak to me in English again. I don’t seem to look Japanese outside of Japan. I was surprised because I think I look totally Japanese. It’s funny that people’s points of view are totally different.

      Could you talk a little about OMIAI, the series that represents a traditional Japanese matchmaking technique.
      OMIAI is a tradition that is somehow still working today. Usually, there is a matchmaker and photographs are exchanged before meeting. If both sides are interested, they can meet for lunch or dinner accompanied by their parents and steps for marriage proceed from there. In the old days, some people chose their marriage partner just through photographs, without even meeting each other. 

      When OMIAI was exhibited in Japan I saw people making various comments in from of the work. People would say things like, “she looks like a good cook; surely she would prepare delicious meals every day,” or “ this girl could be a perfect bride for my son,” or “I can tell she would not be a good housewife,” or “she’s such a graceful girl; she must be the daughter of a decent family.” Comments like that. 

      What was the process of making that work?
      I gained 10 pounds before I started taking the pictures, and in six months I lost forty pounds, because I wanted to look different in each photo. I wanted to change the way my legs looked. 

      Every weekend I went to the hair salon and put on a kimono. Then I went to the photo studio on the street in Japan. I would take a picture and then change my clothes to western dress. Then I would go to the studio again the next weekend. 

      Did you tell the photographer how you wanted it done?
      I told him I was an artist and wanted to make photographs with him. I told him to think that each weekend new girls would show up to make the OMIAI. I didn’t want him to think of me as the same girl who came every weekend. He understood the concept. 

      We had fun. While he was taking pictures, his wife would tell me how to lose weight. She gave me many tips.


      Tomoko Sawada’s work is on view at the Getty until February 21, 2016 in “The Younger Generation: Contemporary Japanese Photography”

      02/11/16

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