David Alfaro Siqueiros

Posted in Getty Conservation Institute

¡América Tropical! Celebrating a Siqueiros Masterpiece

Asumi on the viewing platform of the América Tropical Interpretive Center.
Asumi on the viewing platform of the América Tropical Interpretive Center.

A few weeks ago, on October 9, the much-anticipated unveiling of the recently conserved mural América Tropical by David Alfaro Siqueiros—one of the great Mexican artists of the 20th century—took place. Los Angeles mayor Antonio Villaraigosa and James Cuno, president… More»

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Posted in Conservation, Getty Conservation Institute

América Tropical Is Reborn on 80th Birthday

América Tropical after conservation in 2012. Mural: © ARS, New York / SOMAAP, Mexico City (c) J. Paul Getty Trust
Artwork: © ARS, New York / SOMAAP, Mexico City. Photo: © J. Paul Getty Trust

Today is América Tropical’s 80th birthday. Artist David Alfaro Siqueiros unveiled his mural to a disapproving Los Angeles on Sunday, October 9, 1932. Eighty years later his mural—L.A.’s mural—is now again publicly accessible. This is, frankly, a day that we… More»

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Posted in Conservation, Getty Conservation Institute, Philanthropy

A Big Lift for América Tropical

The canopy to protect the mural America Tropical, weighing 73,000 lbs and boasting an impressive 90-foot span, was lifted aloft by a construction crane and set into place.

Construction for the shelter, viewing platform, and interpretive center that will surround América Tropical, the only surviving public mural by David Alfaro Siqueiros in the United States still in its original location, is moving forward. The mural, located on the… More»

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Posted in Conservation, Getty Conservation Institute, Paintings

Conserving David Siqueiros’ “América Tropical”

Leslie Rainer, GCI senior project specialist, working on América Tropical

América Tropical, the only surviving public mural by David Alfaro Siqueiros in the United States, is one step closer to being on view to you and me. At El Pueblo Historic Monument in downtown Los Angeles, project leaders today broke… More»

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      All Hail Tiberius, Least Media-Savvy of the Roman Emperors

      Tiberius was proclaimed Roman emperor on September 17 in AD 14, exactly 2,000 years ago.

      He was also a bit wacko. “He was the least media-savvy emperor you could imagine,” says curator David Saunders, who has been in charge of this bronze portrait of Tiberius which leaves us on September 22. He point to this description found in the writings of Cassius Dio:

      Tiberius was a patrician of good education, but he had a most peculiar nature. He never let what he desired appear in his conversation, and what he said he wanted he usually did not desire at all. On the contrary, his words indicated the exact opposite of his real purpose; he denied all interest in what he longed for, and urged the claims of what he hated. He would exhibit anger over matters that were far from arousing his wrath, and make a show of affability where he was most vexed…In short, he thought it bad policy for the sovereign to reveal his thoughts; this was often the cause, he said, of great failures, whereas by the opposite course, far more and greater successes were attained.

      Moreover, David tells us, “Tiberius’s accession itself was a farrago: Tiberius sort-of feigning reluctance, the Senate bullying him, he being all, ‘Well, if-I-have-to,’ and in the end—according to Suetonius—saying he’ll do it as long as he can retire.”

      Suetonius is full of great, albeit spurious, anecdotes about poor old Tiberius, David reports. “When someone addressed him as ‘My Lord,’ it is said, Tiberius gave warning that no such insult should ever again be thrown at him.”

      Happy accession, My Lord!

      Portrait Head of Tiberius (“The Lansdowne Tiberius”), early 1st century A.D., Roman. The J. Paul Getty Museum

      Statue of Tiberius (detail), Roman, A.D. 37, Soprintendenza Speciale per i Beni Archeologici di Napoli e Pompei – Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Napoli, Laboratorio di Conservazione e Restauro. Currently on view at the Getty Villa following conservation and study.

      09/17/14

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