earthen architecture

Posted in Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Getty Conservation Institute

Ksours and Kasbahs

Detail of a wall painting in the Residence of the Caid, Kasbah Taourit, Ouarzazate, Morocco
Detail of a wall painting in the Residence of the Caid, Kasbah Taourit, Ouarzazate, Morocco

One of Africa’s most important sites of earthen architecture is the focus of an international conservation project. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Getty Conservation Institute

Peru Field Notebook: An Update from Kuño Tambo

kunotambo_featured

A field team from the Conservation Institute reaches a milestone in its efforts to preserve earthen buildings from earthquakes. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Getty Conservation Institute, Voices

Getty Voices: Peru Field Notebook

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Our new Getty Voices series kicks off with a weeklong view into one of the Getty Conservation Institute’s international field projects. More»

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Posted in Architecture and Design, Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Getty Conservation Institute

A Project of Seismic Proportions

Earthen structures in the vast adobe city of Chan Chan, capital of the Chimu Kingdom in present-day Perum

As Californians, we are well aware of the damage that results from earthquakes, even in new buildings constructed with modern materials. But what happens to historic buildings made of earthen materials such as adobe? These structures can be particularly vulnerable… More»

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      I do not like crooked, twisted, blasted trees. I admire them much more if they are tall, straight, and flourishing. I do not like ruined, tattered cottages. I am not fond of nettles or thistles, or heath blossoms. I have more pleasure in a snug farm-house than a watch-tower—and a troop of tidy, happy villages please me better than the finest banditti in the world.”

      Marianne looked with amazement at Edward, with compassion at her sister. Elinor only laughed.

      —Jane Austen’s Sense and Sensibility, published on October 30, 1811

      Wooded Landscape by Paulus Lieder and Landscape with a Bare Tree and a Ploughman by Leon Bonvin, The J. Paul Getty Museum; Fantastic Oak Tree in the Woods, Carl Wilhelm Kolbe the Elder, The Getty Research Institute

      10/30/14

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