earthquakes

Posted in Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Getty Conservation Institute, Voices

Getty Voices: Peru Field Notebook

EAI_PER_ICA_SW_201112_0280_detail

Our new Getty Voices series kicks off with a weeklong view into one of the Getty Conservation Institute’s international field projects. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Conservation, J. Paul Getty Museum, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

All Shook Up! Protecting Art in an Earthquake

The Agrigento Youth
The Statue of a Kouros (The Agrigento Youth) on loan from the Museo Archeologico Regionale in Agrigento installed in the Getty Villa, October 2010.

When you look at sculpture in the Getty Museum’s galleries, you wouldn’t guess that some of the pedestals are somewhat unusual. Under their polished veneer, they’re engineered to protect art from the movements caused by earthquakes. Many museums in California… More»

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Posted in Antiquities, Getty Villa, J. Paul Getty Museum

Stilt-Walking Actors Extend Their Stay at the Getty Villa

Storage Jar with a Chorus of Stilt Walkers, black-figured amphora attributed to the Swing Painter, Greek (Attic), active about 550-525 B.C. Terracotta, 16 1/8 x 11 7/16 in.  (41 x 29 cm). James Logie Memorial Collection, University of Canterbury

The Art of Ancient Greek Theater closed on January 3, but one loan object from the exhibition won’t be making its way back home for a while. An Attic black-figured amphora, or storage vessel, from the James Logie Memorial Collection at… More»

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      thegetty:

      Happy 4th of July!

      Cheeky children peeking out from behind this American flag*. This was taken in New York between 1890 and 1900 in the studio of a photographer named DeYoung.

      How the 4th of July Solved a Cataloguer’s Mini-Mystery

      Months ago our photography cataloguer came across this image acquired under the name De Youngh. This image was made in New York between 1890-1900, but the copyright status was undetermined…until last week.

      Our registrar came across some references to a New York photographer by the name DeYoung, whose materials were frequently stamped with a unique DeYoung’s signature. The signature matched the marking on the back of this photograph.

      Some digging through an online genealogy database confirmed the first name and life dates of a photographer based in New York with the last nameDeYoung. Our records will be updated reflect this change and the image is officially in the public domain, and will be free to download through Open Content in the future.

      *Oops! We said this was a 48-star flag, but that was used from 1912-1959.

      07/06/15

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