Posted in Getty Research Institute, Research

The Artists the Internet Almost Forgot

Stacey Allan, editor at East of Borneo
Stacey Allan, editor at East of Borneo and organizer of Unforgetting L.A., hosts the first Wikipedia edit-a-thon at the Getty Research Institute.

Building Los Angeles architecture and its architects, one Wikipedia entry at a time. More»

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Posted in Architecture and Design, Getty Research Institute, Research

Wikipedia Edit-a-Thon at the Getty Research Institute to Focus on Architecture and Design

Wikipedia edit-a-thon at the Getty Research Institute

Join us to build a better history of L.A. art through Wikipedia. More»

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Posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, Voices

Getty Voices: Does Text Still Matter?

Red pens, the editor's stock-in-trade

Where images are the primary sources, where does text fit in? Should museums uphold editorial standards, or go with the Web 2.0 flow? More»

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Posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, J. Paul Getty Museum, Paintings

Labeling Turner

Modern Rome–Campo Vaccino, Joseph Mallord William Turner (English, 1775–1851), 1839. Oil on canvas, 36 1/8 x 48 1/4 in. (unframed), 48 1/4 x 60 3/8 x 4 3/8 in. (framed). The J. Paul Getty Museum, 2011.6

Writing the gallery label for a painting can sometimes feel like an art form in itself, a kind of circumscribed descriptive poetry not unrelated to haiku. How, in fewer than 100 words, do you capture the essence of an object,… More»

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      #ThyCaptionBe: Don’t Be So Crabby

      You captioned this detail. And we’re revealing the full story now.

      Jaws reference or some rather nasty surf and turf? It’s actually a depiction of the astrological symbol for Cancer.

      Here’s the full story:

      This peasant might be tired from working in the hot sun, but this is no time to go for a swim to cool off! 

      We all know there’s a risk of encountering creepy crawlers when out gardening, but that giant sinister lobster lurking in the water is actually a crab – the astrological symbol for Cancer. 

      Medieval prayer books often include a yearly calendar at the beginning of the text listing important feast days. Each month is usually accompanied by illuminations of seasonal activities and zodiacal signs, such as this one for the month of June.

      #ThyCaptionBe is a celebration of modern interpretations of medieval aesthetics. You guess what the heck is going on, then we myth-bust.


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