education

Posted in Art & Archives, People & Places

An 11-Year-Old Reviews the Getty Villa

Harper Tzou at the Getty Villa
Photo courtesy of Tesi Athans-Lareau

The best of ancient gods and glam More»

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Posted in Education, Getty Center, technology

A Night at the Museum: The 2016 Getty/USC Game Jam

The Daguerreotype Process

The Getty brings USC students together to create artful interactive games. More»

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Posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, technology

A Night at the Museum: Getty/USC Game Jam Is Back

Getty Game Jam 2016

USC students game the Getty. More»

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Posted in Art, Art & Archives, Education, J. Paul Getty Museum

Extending Learning Outside the Classroom: Daring Greatly with Self-Portraiture

Community Photoworks photo by Gracie Globerman
By Gracie Globerman

L.A. 10th graders explore self-expression through photography and writing More»

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Posted in Education, Getty Center

What Can You Do with Kids at the Getty Center?

A girl shows off a mask she decorated in the Getty Center's Family Room

Visit the giant bug, create a scavenger hunt on the fly, and help yourself to the giant rolling lawn. More»

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Posted in Art, Art & Archives, Education, J. Paul Getty Museum

Back to School: Great Teachers Get Creative at the Core

Creative at the Core K-12 teacher workshop at the Getty Museum

A weeklong program helps teachers bring artworks into their classrooms. More»

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Posted in Art & Archives, Education, Getty360, Paintings

Communal Art Project Remakes the Flower Still Life

Sketching a moth at Family Art Lab: Still Lifes in Blossom

Kids and adults work together to create giant still lifes teeming with flowers, fruit, and insects. More»

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Posted in Antiquities, Art & Archives, Education, Getty Villa

An Epic Performance of Homer’s “Odyssey” by L.A. Sixth Graders

Queen Arete of Phaeacia performs in Ms. Penalosa’s honors-level language arts classroom
Queen Arete of Phaeacia performs in Ms. Penalosa’s honors-level language arts classroom

Students time-travel to ancient Greece through art and theater. More»

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Posted in Education, Getty360, J. Paul Getty Museum

Play’s the Thing at Museum Game Zone

Playing ShapeScapes at Museum Game Zone

A new pilot program is all about games. More»

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Posted in Art, Art & Archives, Education, Getty Conservation Institute

Bringing the Cave Temples of Dunhuang to California Classrooms

Our group at the Dunhuang City Museum
Photo: Karen Clancy

Chinese culture comes to California classrooms. More»

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      A Brief History of the Fleur-de-lis in Art

      The fleur-de-lis, a familiar symbol with varied meanings and a rather obscure origin.

      If you read the labels of objects in museums bearing the fleur-de-lis (in French, fleur de lys, pronounced with the final “s”), you might notice that they were all made in France before the French Revolution of 1789. 

      What’s less apparent is that the fleur-de-lis marks objects that bear witness to a dramatic history of monarchy, democracy, and war: they speak to the inherent power of trappings commissioned for and by France’s pre-revolutionary kings.

      Adopted as a royal emblem in France by the 1100s, the fleur-de-lis can be traced to early Frankish monarchs including Clovis I, who converted to Christianity in 496, and the renowned Charlemagne. 

      A French word, fleur-de-lis translates literally to “lily flower.” This is appropriate given the association of lilies with purity (and the Virgin Mary) and given that France has long been known as the “Eldest Daughter of the Church.” In truth, the stylized flower most closely resembles a yellow iris. 

      As a heraldic symbol used in the arms of the French monarchy, the fleur-de-lis often appears in yellow or gold tones and set on a blue shield. 

      Given its intimate royal associations, the fleur-de-lis invoked the ire of revolutionaries even before the fall of the monarchy in 1792. In addition to toppling royal statues, vandals chipped away at crowns and fleurs-de-lis adorning the façades of buildings.

      Full blog post on the Getty Iris here.

      04/28/16

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