elementary school visits

Posted in Behind the Scenes, Education, Getty Center, Photographs, Film, and Video

Camera-Ready: Hooper Elementary Students on a Digital Scavenger Hunt

Students from Hooper Avenue Elementary School participate in a scavenger hunt at the Getty Center organized by John Divola

The Getty Center is one of the most-photographed landmarks in Los Angeles, with visitors snapping images of its art, architecture, gardens, and breathtaking views. In March, the Getty Museum’s education department chose to up the ante with a “Digital Scavenger… More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Education, Getty Center, J. Paul Getty Museum

“Art Together” Program Ignites Students’ Enthusiasm for Museums

Some of the many details found by Art Together students on A Storm on a Mediterranean Coast by Claude-Joseph Vernet

As a new school year begins, we’re excited to launch the third season of Art Together, which invites local students and teachers to visit the Getty Center three times over the course of the year. Following last year’s program, when… More»

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Posted in Education, Getty Center, J. Paul Getty Museum

Once, Twice, Three Times! Students Make the Museum Their Own

Students from Palms Elementary in the photography galleries at the Getty Center

Palms Elementary was our partner this year for Art Together, a pilot program that invited students to explore the Museum in depth over multiple visits. We invited Mrs. Millenbaugh’s fourth-grade class at Palms to come the Museum three times. Why… More»

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      everyartisthasabday:

      Botticelli’s Mystical Nativity was hidden for many centuries. Once found, it earned its name from both the unusual Nativity symbolism and Greek inscription at the top.

      Boticelli believed he was living through the Tribulation, which is clear in the mysterious inscription:

      This picture, at the end of the year 1500, in the troubles of Italy, I Alessandro, in the half-time after the time, painted, according to the eleventh chapter of Saint John, in the second woe of the Apocalypse, during the release of the devil for three-and-a-half years; then he shall be bound in the twelfth chapter and we shall see [him buried] as in this picture.

      It is the only surviving work with his signature.

      03/02/15

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