Engaged Observers

Posted in Education, Getty Center, J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

High School Students Explore Photojournalism with Sudharak Olwe

olwe

Don’t call Sudharak Olwe a teacher. When the photojournalist from India met with a class from Venice High School at the Getty Center to discuss technique and creativity in photography, he turned the gathering from a workshop into a conversation…. More»

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Posted in Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Seven Documentaries Inspired by Photojournalism

Kids + money: Megan, 11, and Ashley, 13, at their Calabasas home. Photograph by Lauren Greenfield/ INSTITUTE

“Witnesses in Action,” the documentary film series I curated earlier this month, followed the lenses of brave and talented photographers who took their cameras to far-flung locales. We started in mile-long factories in China, travelled to bizarre beached shipwrecks in… More»

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Posted in Getty Center, J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Friday Night: Susan Meiselas Discusses Her Work at the Getty Center

Traditional Indian dance mask adopted by the rebels during the fight against Somoza, Nicaragua, Susan Meiselas, negative 1978; print 1980s © Susan Meiselas / Magnum Photos
Photographer Susan Meiselas appears at the Getty Center this Friday evening to talk about her work and screen her 1991 film Pictures from a Revolution. Joining her to discuss the depiction of Latin America is Miguel Tinker Salas, professor of... More»
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Posted in Photographs, Film, and Video

I Have a Dream

New York City from Black and White in America Leonard Freed, 1963.  © Leonard Freed / Magnum Photos, Inc.
One night when I was 10, I sat down to do some homework, reading a speech in my history book. It was just another day, just another assignment. But as I read this speech, I became confused and angry. Every... More»
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      Olympian Census #4: Aphrodite

      Get the stats on your favorite (and not-so-favorite) gods and goddesses on view at the Getty Center.

      Roman name: Venus

      Employment: Goddess of Love and Beauty

      Place of residence: Mount Olympus

      Parents: Born out of sea foam formed when Uranus’s castrated genitals were thrown into the ocean

      Marital status: Married to Hephaestus, the God of Blacksmiths, but had many lovers, both immortal and mortal

      Offspring: Aeneas, Cupid, Eros, Harmonia, Hermaphroditos, and more

      Symbol: Dove, swan, and roses

      Special talent: Being beautiful and sexy could never have been easier for this Greek goddess

      Highlights reel:

      • Zeus knew she was trouble when she walked in (Sorry, Taylor Swift) to Mount Olympus for the first time. So Zeus married Aphrodite to his son Hephaestus (Vulcan), forming the perfect “Beauty and the Beast” couple.
      • When Aphrodite and Persephone, the queen of the underworld, both fell in love with the beautiful mortal boy Adonis, Zeus gave Adonis the choice to live with one goddess for 1/3 of the year and the other for 2/3. Adonis chose to live with Aphrodite longer, only to die young.
      • Aphrodite offered Helen, the most beautiful mortal woman, to Paris, a Trojan prince, to win the Golden Apple from him over Hera and Athena. She just conveniently forgot the fact that Helen was already married. Oops. Hello, Trojan War!

      Olympian Census is a 12-part series profiling gods in art at the Getty Center.

      08/03/15

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