exhibition design

Posted in Antiquities, Behind the Scenes, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Villa

Curating The Aztec Pantheon

Tzitzimitl (Demon), Aztec, 1440–69, found near the Templo Mayor, Mexico City. Terracotta, stucco, and pigment, 176 x 80 x 50 cm. Museo del Templo Mayor, Mexico City. CONACULTA-INAH-MEX © foto zabé. Reproduction authorized by the National Institute of Anthropology and History
Tzitzimitl (Demon), Aztec, 1440–69, found near the Templo Mayor, Mexico City. Terracotta, stucco, and pigment, 176 x 80 x 50 cm. Museo del Templo Mayor, Mexico City. CONACULTA-INAH-MEX © foto zabé. Reproduction authorized by the National Institute of Anthropology and History

The premise of The Aztec Pantheon and the Art of Empire is a unique one: that just as classical antiquity colored Spanish perceptions of Mesoamerica, the experience of Aztec civilization piqued curiosity about Renaissance Europe’s own ancient heritage. As curators,… More»

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Posted in Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Research Institute

Think Local, Exhibit Global—Research Institute Exhibitions on the Move

Installation view of Art, Anti-Art, Non-Art: Experimentations in the Public Sphere in Postwar Japan, 1950-1970 at the University of Michigan Museum of Art. Photo: Randy Stegmeyer

Off the tram, up the stairs and take a sharp right before going into the main entrance pavilion. Head into the building across from the Cafe. That’s where you’ll usually find the distinctive exhibitions of the Getty Research Institute (GRI)…. More»

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      Dressed in the finest 17th century fashions, a woman personifying September shops the local market.

      This sketch of September, the rich landscape, and bountiful harvest were made for paintings of the months for Elector Maximilian I of Bavaria for a dining hall in his Munich palace.

      Fashion Fridays explores art, history, and costume in the Getty collection.

      Personification of September, about 1644, Joachim von Sandrart. J. Paul Getty Museum.

      09/19/14

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