fashion photography

Posted in Getty Center

Fashion Off the 405, Weekender Edition

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In focus: visitors’ weekend style. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Center

Fashion Off the 405, Kids’ Edition

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Kids have the loudest style, and we love that! More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Center

Fashion Off the 405

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What are our visitors wearing to stay cool this summer? More»

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Posted in Exhibitions and Installations, Photographs, Film, and Video

Carré Otis on Herb Ritts and Women

Carré in Profile, Paradise Cove / Herb Ritts

You’ve seen them on billboards, magazines, and TV—images of young, thin, overtly seductive women posed to sell. Herb Ritts photographed the world’s top models for ads and fashion spreads, but his women are different. Though beautiful, they have strength and… More»

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Posted in Antiquities, Art, Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

From Malibu to Cyprus and Back Again

Cindy Crawford, Ferre 3 Malibu / Herb Ritts

Having spent a good deal of time with Aphrodite of late, I found in Herb Ritts: L.A. Style a real feast—not just for the eyes, but for the mind. The two exhibitions overlap in their focus on the seductive allure… More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

How Herb Ritts Created an Icon

Versace Dress, Back View, El Mirage / Herb Ritts

When Herb Ritts created this image, it was touch-and-go whether he would get his crew and model off the El Mirage lake bed before a storm swept through. Mark McKenna, now executive director of the Herb Ritts Foundation, was Ritts’s… More»

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      "Hey Dude!"

      That doesn’t seem like too far off for a cry of a street vendor from the series called “Cries of Paris.

      However, this is an idealized depiction of a peasant who has sturdy clogs, a short jacket, and apron. Such vision sold higher numbers of these small sculptures to wealthy patrons.

      Figure of a Street Vendor, about 1755 - 1760, Mennecy Porcelain Manufactory. J. Paul Getty Museum.

      10/02/14

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