film series

Posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Two Darkly Humorous Czech Films about the Craziness of Politics

Poster for the film The Joke, 1968
Poster for The Joke (Žert), 1968

“What’s so bracing about Czech New Wave films is how honest and artful they are.” More»

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Posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Discovering “Daisies”

ssedmikr

A film as beautiful as it is weird. More»

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Posted in Getty Research Institute, Photographs, Film, and Video

Two Unforgettable Films about World War I

Still from J'Accuse featuring undead soldiers questioning their sacrifice
Still from J'Accuse

Two classics screen for the war’s centenary. More»

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Posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Tokyo Stories

Still from Adrift in Tokyo / 2007
Courtesy of The Japan Foundation, Los Angeles

Three filmmakers have radically different takes on the city of Tokyo. More»

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Posted in Getty Villa, Photographs, Film, and Video

Orpheus Goes to the Movies

Still from Black Orpheus / Marcel Camus
Still from Black Orpheus (Marcel Camus, 1959). Used with permission from The Criterion Collection.

Two cinematic retellings of the Orpheus myth are both controversial and compelling. More»

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Posted in Architecture and Design, Getty Center, Photographs, Film, and Video

Do Androids Dream of Electric L.A.?

Do Androids Dream of Electric L.A.?
Rutger Hauer as Roy Batty in Blade Runner, 1982. Courtesy of and © The Blade Runner Partnership | © Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc.

As some parts of the world approach the dystopian, cyberpunk 2019 Los Angeles depicted in Blade Runner, the film’s relation to architecture and environment is worth another look. More»

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Posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Neon Hitmen

tokyo_featured

Tokyo Drifter, screening this weekend, “smacks you in the face with a bucket of WTF paint.” More»

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Posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Portraits of Brute and Brood

Marlon Brando and Vivien Leigh in A Streetcar Named Desire (1951)

“Never allow yourself to feel anything, because you always feel too much.” —Marlon Brando “Only the gentle are ever really strong.” —James Dean Beyond fitting, this weekend’s concluding film series What Becomes a Legend offers the increasingly rare opportunity to… More»

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Posted in Getty Research Institute, Photographs, Film, and Video

World War Zinnemann

Montgomery Clift, Ivan Jandl, and Fred Zinnemann on the set of The Search

From Casablanca to Saving Private Ryan, the horrors and heroisms of World War II have provided decades of cinematic material. However, as director Fred Zinnemann masterfully demonstrated, meticulous exploration of the human experience—both immediately before the war (The Seventh Cross,… More»

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Posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Cocteau Dreams, In Nitrate

Still from Jean Cocteau's Blood of a Poet

“One of the characteristics of the dream is that nothing surprises us in it. With no regret, we agree to live in it with strangers, completely cut off from our habits and friends.”―Jean Cocteau We’re offering an array of films… More»

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    • photo from Tumblr

      ROSE

      This milky pink boomed into popularity because of a marketing ploy, a mistress, and its ambiguous origins.

      In an effort to compete with the renowned Meissen porcelain factory, the French Sèvres manufactory recruited the glamorous Madame de Pompadour (mistress to King Louis XV). Like a smart sponsorship deal, Sèvres gave her all the porcelain she requested. 

      Introduced in 1757, this rich pink exploded on the scene thanks to favoritism by Madame Pompadour herself. 

      The glaze itself had a weird history. To the Europeans it looked Chinese, and to the Chinese it was European. It was made based on a secret 17th-century glassmaker’s technique, involving mixing glass with flecks of gold.

      For more on colors and their often surprising histories, check out The Brilliant History of Color in Art.

      12/19/14

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