Four Minds on Herzog

Four experts share their experiences of Werner Herzog’s video installation Hearsay of the Soul.

Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Photographs, Film, and Video

Four Minds on Herzog: A Conversation with Glenn Phillips

Glenn Phillips in Werner Herzog's Hearsay of the Soul
Curator Glenn Phillips, photographed inside Werner Herzog’s installation Hearsay of the Soul

“You’re only rewarded by any encounter with an artwork if you get something out of it.” How to approach Werner Herzog. More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Photographs, Film, and Video

Four Minds on Herzog: A Conversation with Nancy Perloff

Nancy Perloff in Werner Herzog's Hearsay of the Soul
Curator Nancy Perloff, photographed inside Werner Herzog's installation Hearsay of the Soul

“The end is a kind of apotheosis. Maybe that sounds too romantic or spiritual. But the single most remarkable thing is that you lose all sense of time.” More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Photographs, Film, and Video

Four Minds on Herzog: A Conversation with Anne Woollett

Anne Woollett
Curator Anne Woolett, photographed inside the installation Hearsay of the Soul

The deep appeal of the imagined landscape. More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Photographs, Film, and Video

Four Minds on Herzog: A Conversation with Paul Young

Paul Young
Paul Young photographed within Hearsay of the Soul at the Getty Center. "It feels very personal, and that’s what makes it interesting," he says.

“I think he sees Hearsay of the Soul as a poem, and doesn’t want to make a documentary—that was a very deliberate choice. It feels very personal, and that’s what makes it interesting.” More»

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      Masked Harlequin, the commedia dell’arte’s leading man, lures an innocent, elegantly dressed young lady into the world of prostitution. She’s caught the eye of a displeased young man, dressed in dapper clothes. They stand out in this scene of costumed characters in exaggerated clothing. 

      Gillot’s light, quick brushstrokes mimics the satirical subject and lighthearted portrayal of human folly.

      Fashion Fridays explores art, history, and costume inspired by the exhibition Rococo to Revolution #NowOnView

      Scene from the Italian Comedy (recto), about 1700, Claude Gillot. The J. Paul Getty Museum

      07/25/14

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