Four Minds on Herzog

Four experts share their experiences of Werner Herzog’s video installation Hearsay of the Soul.

Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Photographs, Film, and Video

Four Minds on Herzog: A Conversation with Glenn Phillips

Glenn Phillips in Werner Herzog's Hearsay of the Soul
Curator Glenn Phillips, photographed inside Werner Herzog’s installation Hearsay of the Soul

“You’re only rewarded by any encounter with an artwork if you get something out of it.” How to approach Werner Herzog. More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Photographs, Film, and Video

Four Minds on Herzog: A Conversation with Nancy Perloff

Nancy Perloff in Werner Herzog's Hearsay of the Soul
Curator Nancy Perloff, photographed inside Werner Herzog's installation Hearsay of the Soul

“The end is a kind of apotheosis. Maybe that sounds too romantic or spiritual. But the single most remarkable thing is that you lose all sense of time.” More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Photographs, Film, and Video

Four Minds on Herzog: A Conversation with Anne Woollett

Anne Woollett
Curator Anne Woolett, photographed inside the installation Hearsay of the Soul

The deep appeal of the imagined landscape. More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Photographs, Film, and Video

Four Minds on Herzog: A Conversation with Paul Young

Paul Young
Paul Young photographed within Hearsay of the Soul at the Getty Center. "It feels very personal, and that’s what makes it interesting," he says.

“I think he sees Hearsay of the Soul as a poem, and doesn’t want to make a documentary—that was a very deliberate choice. It feels very personal, and that’s what makes it interesting.” More»

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    • photo from Tumblr

      Eye-to-eye with a mystery man.

      He closely resembles painter Francois Boucher, whose eyes rendered paintings like this one

      In 18th century France, terracotta busts were popular additions to the home as they were relatively inexpensive, and fit for both middle class and wealthy consumers.

      See the full picture here.

      Eye-to-eye connects the peoples of yesterday to you through art.

      Bust of a Man, about 1760, Attributed to Jean-Jacques Caffieri. J. Paul Getty Museum.

      10/01/14

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