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Posted in Ancient World, Antiquities, Education, Getty Villa

Reclining and Dining (and Drinking) in Ancient Rome

A Roman Feast / Roberto Bompiani

The ancient Greeks had a recumbent approach to their (male-only) dinner parties, as I discussed in a previous post: elite men reclined, propped on pillows, to drink, converse, and—sometimes—overindulge. The practice of reclining and dining continued into ancient Rome, but… More»

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Posted in Antiquities, Behind the Scenes, Education, Getty Villa

Reclining and Dining (and Drinking) in Ancient Greece

Getty Villa docent Don Petersen reclines on his left side, elbow raised on a stack of pillows, with his right knee bent. He holds a skyphos, a common stemless drinking cup.

Elite Greeks and Romans reclined to dine, and ordinary people copied them when they could. Although the practice seems strange to us, it must have been both comfortable and convenient, since reclining during meals spread throughout the Mediterranean and survived… More»

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      thegetty:

      Happy 4th of July!

      Cheeky children peeking out from behind this American flag*. This was taken in New York between 1890 and 1900 in the studio of a photographer named DeYoung.

      How the 4th of July Solved a Cataloguer’s Mini-Mystery

      Months ago our photography cataloguer came across this image acquired under the name De Youngh. This image was made in New York between 1890-1900, but the copyright status was undetermined…until last week.

      Our registrar came across some references to a New York photographer by the name DeYoung, whose materials were frequently stamped with a unique DeYoung’s signature. The signature matched the marking on the back of this photograph.

      Some digging through an online genealogy database confirmed the first name and life dates of a photographer based in New York with the last nameDeYoung. Our records will be updated reflect this change and the image is officially in the public domain, and will be free to download through Open Content in the future.

      *Oops! We said this was a 48-star flag, but that was used from 1912-1959.

      07/06/15

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