George Herms

Posted in Education, Exhibitions and Installations, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

To Walter with Love: Ed Kienholz’s “Walter Hopps Hopps Hopps”

Walter Hopps Hopps Hopps / Edward Kienholz

Sometimes, only a friend will tell you what they really think. Take the case of artist Ed Kienholz and curator Walter Hopps. Kienholz’s over-life-size assemblage portrait of his friend, Walter Hopps Hopps Hopps—the inspiration for our collage meet-up this Saturday—is… More»

Also tagged , , , , , , , , Leave a comment
Posted in Education, J. Paul Getty Museum

Invitation of the Week: Collage Meet-Up on October 29

Analia Saban and Claire de Dobay Rifelj at a collage workshop on October 19, 2011

Update! See our Flickr set from the meet-up here! We’re doing something different for our Question of the Week series on the Iris this month: an invitation of the week. Join us at the Getty Center on Saturday, October 29,… More»

Also tagged , , , , , , , Leave a comment
Posted in Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Research Institute

It Happened in L.A.: George Herms Gets Creative for Rent Money

Announcement for “Raffle,” a Tap City Circus raffle in Los Angeles, June 6, 1965. Designed by George Herms

George Herms is known for his poetic assemblages of discarded, disheveled materials. But back in the ’60s, he had preoccupations besides art: he was “tapped out”—that is, broke and ready to tap-dance on street corners for cash—and facing eviction. His… More»

Also tagged , , , , , , Leave a comment
Posted in Art, Getty Research Institute

Avant-Garde Antics: The Art of Display in Postwar Los Angeles

Wallace Berman’s gallery in Larkspur. Photo by Charles Brittin. Research Library, The Getty Research Institute, 2005.M.11

How do you hold a “secret exhibition”? In 1957, Los Angeles artist George Herms did just that, setting up his assemblage sculptures among the foundation blocks of a row of demolished buildings in Hermosa Beach. The show wasn’t publicized, and… More»

Also tagged , , , , , , , 2 Responses
  • Facebook

  • Twitter

  • Tumblr

    • photo from Tumblr

      The idealized countryside painted by a native city dweller.

      This light and color study wasn’t meant for exhibition, but rather was a way for Corot to explore his new scenery outside of the studio. 

      Houses near Orleans, about 1830, Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot. J. Paul Getty Museum.

      08/21/14

  • Flickr