Getty Museum collection

Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Simultaneous Viewing and Ray Metzker’s Composites

Chicago / Ray K. Metzker
The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, Gift of Hallmark Cards, Inc., 2005.27.1966. © Ray K. Metzker

The exhibition The Photographs of Ray K. Metzker and the Institute of Design in the Center for Photographs charts the five-decade-long career of Philadelphia-based photographer Ray K. Metzker and offers a context for his visual aesthetic through a selection of works by founding members and influential students of Chicago’s Institute of Design. More»

Also tagged , , , , 1 Response
Posted in Art, Getty Center

Art Takes a Rest as Getty Center Closes for Carmageddon II

Raymond de Magnoncourt / Chasseriau

The Getty Center will not be open for gentleman or lady callers this weekend, Saturday and Sunday, September 29 and 30. Our social calendar is affected by the demolition of the Mulholland Drive Bridge, which requires the 405 freeway to… More»

Also tagged , , , Leave a comment
Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Manuscripts and Books

Meet the Artist Who Helped Launch the Renaissance in Florence

The Ascension of Christ from the Laudario of Sant’Agnese / Pacino di Bonaguida

In the early 1300s, 150 years before Leonardo and Michelangelo walked its streets, Florence was a hotbed of artistic production and creativity. Three works in the Getty Museum’s collection produced in the city at this dynamic moment—all by the same… More»

Also tagged , , , , , , , , 1 Response
Posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

Waxing and Waning of Summer in Decorative Arts & Sculpture Conservation

Applying a protective wax coating to Jack Zajac's Big Skull and Horn in Two Parts II

Every Monday—when the Museum is closed to visitors and Getty staff soldier on despite the closure of the coffee carts—the Getty’s outdoor sculptures get washed and rinsed of the week’s helping of dirt, pollution, bird guano, and spider webs. This… More»

Also tagged , , , Leave a comment
Posted in Behind the Scenes, Education, J. Paul Getty Museum, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

18th-Century Art for the 21st-Century Classroom

Participants at the Getty Museum's Art and Language Arts alumni event - August 11, 2012

Students are often lectured at, asked to receive information and not question what is being said. As a college student, I’ve experienced this first-hand. This summer, I got to explore more creative approaches to learning as part of the team… More»

Also tagged , , , , , , , , Leave a comment
Posted in Art, Education, Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Digital Display: Student Scavenger Hunt on View

The Digital Scavenger hunt photos on display in the Getty's Museum Entrance Hall

The Getty Museum is full of fabulous furniture, splendid sculpture, and of course, powerful paintings. What if you were asked to hunt for some of the most interesting details and objects in these works of art? Would you be able… More»

Also tagged , , , , , , Leave a comment
Posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum

The Devil Is in the Details: New Collection Page Zoom

Demon depictions

We recently began to add high-resolution images of objects from the collection on our website, enabling you to zoom in and observe tiny details (look for the zoom button on object pages). We started with over 1,700 antiquities, manuscripts, drawings,… More»

Also tagged , , , Leave a comment
Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Manuscripts and Books

To Hell and Back: Dante’s Inferno in Art and Film

Filipo Argenti receiving his eternal torments in the River Styx (courtesy ©2007, Dante Film, LLC)

UPDATE: The screening of the 1911 film L’Inferno, scheduled for Saturday, June 23, at 3:00 p.m., has been cancelled. We apologize for the inconvenience. The other two films will screen as planned. The Museum’s Department of Manuscripts recently opened the… More»

Also tagged , , , , , , , Leave a comment
Posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, Paintings

A Horse, Of Course! Curator Anne Woollett on Equine Painting

The "Piebald" Horse,  Paulus Potter, Dutch, about 1650 - 1654, Oil on canvas, 19 1/2 x 17 11/16 in., The J. Paul Getty Museum
The "Piebald" Horse

Horses have been the subject of paintings, sculptures, drawings, and other renderings for thousands of years. They have been depicted as companions of man, within picturesque landscapes, and in dynamic races, chases, and battles. Anne Woollett, curator of paintings at… More»

Also tagged , , , , , , 3 Responses
Posted in Behind the Scenes, Conservation, J. Paul Getty Museum, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

All Shook Up! Protecting Art in an Earthquake

The Agrigento Youth
The Statue of a Kouros (The Agrigento Youth) on loan from the Museo Archeologico Regionale in Agrigento installed in the Getty Villa, October 2010.

When you look at sculpture in the Getty Museum’s galleries, you wouldn’t guess that some of the pedestals are somewhat unusual. Under their polished veneer, they’re engineered to protect art from the movements caused by earthquakes. Many museums in California… More»

Also tagged , , , , , , , 2 Responses
  • Facebook

  • Twitter

  • Tumblr

    • photo from Tumblr

      ROSE

      This milky pink boomed into popularity because of a marketing ploy, a mistress, and its ambiguous origins.

      In an effort to compete with the renowned Meissen porcelain factory, the French Sèvres manufactory recruited the glamorous Madame de Pompadour (mistress to King Louis XV). Like a smart sponsorship deal, Sèvres gave her all the porcelain she requested. 

      Introduced in 1757, this rich pink exploded on the scene thanks to favoritism by Madame Pompadour herself. 

      The glaze itself had a weird history. To the Europeans it looked Chinese, and to the Chinese it was European. It was made based on a secret 17th-century glassmaker’s technique, involving mixing glass with flecks of gold.

      For more on colors and their often surprising histories, check out The Brilliant History of Color in Art.

      12/19/14

  • Flickr