Getty Museum collection

Posted in Antiquities, Art & Archives, J. Paul Getty Museum, Manuscripts and Books

A Hero’s Journey and the Dance of Dragons

Alexander the Great Under Water
Alexander the Great Under Water (detail), about 1400–10, unknown artist, in the World Chronicle. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Ms. 33, fol. 220v

Over-the-top tales of Alexander the Great from the pages of medieval manuscripts. More»

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Posted in Art & Archives, J. Paul Getty Museum, Manuscripts and Books, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

The Sun King Illuminated: An Emblem Book for Louis XIV

Escutcheon with a Landscape / Jacques Bailly
Escutcheon with a Landscape (detail) from Emblems for Louis XIV, text in French and Latin by Charles Perrault, illuminations by Jacques Bailly, about 1663–68. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Ms. 11, leaf 5

Sleuthing the symbols of Louis XIV in the Getty Center galleries. More»

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Posted in Art & Archives, J. Paul Getty Museum, Prints and Drawings

The Secrets of Renaissance Creativity

Studies of Figures behind a Balustrade / Andrea del Sarto
Studies of Figures behind a Balustrade (detail), about 1522, Andrea del Sarto. Red chalk, 6 7/8 x 7 7/8 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 92.GB.74

A curator’s take on Andrea del Sarto. More»

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Posted in Art, Art & Archives, Paintings

A Pop Soundtrack to the Getty Collection, Vol. 1

Why Hasn't He Called
Young Italian Woman at a Table, about 1895–1900, Paul Cézanne. Oil on canvas. 36 1/4 x 28 15/16 inches. The J. Paul Getty Museum

Music shows off the collection in a new light. More»

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Posted in Art & Archives, J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video, technology

Opposites Attract

Tarascon / Charles Tarascon
Tarascon, 1852, Charles Nègre. Waxed paper negative with selectively applied pigment, 9 5/16 x 13 1/16 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 2015.43.9

For 19th-century photographers, the negative was the true work of art. More»

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Posted in Art & Archives, J. Paul Getty Museum, Sculpture and Decorative Arts, technology

A Bronze God for the Sun King

Belvedere Antinous - detail of head and torso / Tacca
Belvedere Antinous (detail), about 1630, attributed to Pietro Tacca. Bronze, 25 1/2 in. high. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 2014.40

Travels of a bronze Hermes, from Florence to Paris to L.A. More»

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Posted in Art & Archives, Editor's Picks, J. Paul Getty Museum, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

Froth and Folly: Nobility and Perfumery at the Court of Versailles

Potpourri holder once owned by Madame de Pompadour
Detail of a potpourri holder once owned by Madame de Pompadour. One of a pair of vases (pots-pourris fontaine or pots-pourri à dauphins), about 1760, made at the Sèvres Manufactory with painted decoration attributed to Charles-Nicolas Dodin. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 78.DE.358

How did Louis XIV’s court smell? More»

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Posted in Art & Archives, J. Paul Getty Museum, Manuscripts and Books

The Rise and Fall of a Court Artist in Renaissance Italy

Initial A: Young Christ Blessing (detail) from Antiphonal P of San Giorgio Maggiore, Belbello da Pavia, about 1467-1470. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Ms. 96, verso
Initial A: Young Christ Blessing (detail) from Antiphonal P of San Giorgio Maggiore, Belbello da Pavia, about 1467-1470. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Ms. 96, verso

The unusual life tale of Renaissance illuminator Belbello da Pavia More»

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Posted in Art, Art & Archives, J. Paul Getty Museum, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

This Just In: A Rediscovered Bernini

Bust of Pope Paul V / Gian Lorenzo Bernini
Newly installed at the Getty Center: Bust of Pope Paul V, 1621, Gian Lorenzo Bernini. Marble. The J. Paul Getty Museum

An elusive masterpiece joins the collection More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Getty Conservation Institute

Conservation Tools: The Microfading Tester

Vincent Beltran uses a microfading tester on a tapestry from the Getty Museum’s collection

Measuring color changes in light-sensitive works of art. More»

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      A Brief History of the Fleur-de-lis in Art

      The fleur-de-lis, a familiar symbol with varied meanings and a rather obscure origin.

      If you read the labels of objects in museums bearing the fleur-de-lis (in French, fleur de lys, pronounced with the final “s”), you might notice that they were all made in France before the French Revolution of 1789. 

      What’s less apparent is that the fleur-de-lis marks objects that bear witness to a dramatic history of monarchy, democracy, and war: they speak to the inherent power of trappings commissioned for and by France’s pre-revolutionary kings.

      Adopted as a royal emblem in France by the 1100s, the fleur-de-lis can be traced to early Frankish monarchs including Clovis I, who converted to Christianity in 496, and the renowned Charlemagne. 

      A French word, fleur-de-lis translates literally to “lily flower.” This is appropriate given the association of lilies with purity (and the Virgin Mary) and given that France has long been known as the “Eldest Daughter of the Church.” In truth, the stylized flower most closely resembles a yellow iris. 

      As a heraldic symbol used in the arms of the French monarchy, the fleur-de-lis often appears in yellow or gold tones and set on a blue shield. 

      Given its intimate royal associations, the fleur-de-lis invoked the ire of revolutionaries even before the fall of the monarchy in 1792. In addition to toppling royal statues, vandals chipped away at crowns and fleurs-de-lis adorning the façades of buildings.

      Full blog post on the Getty Iris here.

      04/28/16

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