Voices

Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Research Institute, Voices

Portraits of Africa, from Colonization to E-Waste | Getty Voices

Triumph of the Will (FARDC Soldiers Demonstrate the Purpose of an Old Belgian Commando Training Structure at Rumangabo Military Base) / Richard Mosse
© Richard Mosse. Courtesy Jack Shainman Gallery

Richard Mosse and Pieter Hugo create arresting portraits that evoke Africa’s colonial past. More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Research Institute, Voices

Encounters with Indigenous Mexico | Getty Voices

The Zocalo, Mexico City / Cartas de relacion
The Zócalo, Mexico City's main square, depicted soon after the Spanish Conquest. Detail from Tenochtitlan, woodcut in Hernán Cortés, Cartas de relación (Nuremberg, 1524). The Getty Research Institute, 93-B9631

“There is so much to think over that I do not know how to describe it, seeing things as we did that had never been heard of or seen before, not even dreamed about.” More»

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Posted in Ancient World, Antiquities, Voices

Understanding the Cyrus Cylinder | Getty Voices

The Cyrus Cylinder as installed at the Getty Villa / Achaemenid
The Cyrus Cylinder, Achaemenid, after 539 B.C. Terracotta, 22.9 x 10 cm. The British Museum

Curator David Saunders attempts to fit the need-to-knows about the Cyrus Cylinder into a nutshell. More»

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Posted in Architecture and Design, Getty Research Institute, Prints and Drawings, Voices

Getty Voices: From Paint to Pixels

Four color spheres
In Philipp Otto Runge, Farben-Kugel (Hamburg, 1810), plate opposite p. 15 Hand-colored etchings 85-B14217 Research Library, The Getty Research Institute

How do you transform a 19th-century watercolor into a digital logo? More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Getty Conservation Institute, Research, Voices

Behind the Scenes at the GCI | Getty Voices

GCI Lab \ Beril Bicer-Simsir
Scientist Beril Bicer-Simsir testing grouts in the Getty Conservation Institute's laboratories.

A relatively new discipline, conservation science merges art and analysis to solve thorny conservation problems. More»

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Posted in Exhibitions and Installations, Photographs, Film, and Video, Voices

Getty Voices: Directing Landscape

werner_herzog

Music and landscape combine to create a powerful “separate reality” in Werner Herzog’s work. More»

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Posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, Voices

Getty Voices: Does Text Still Matter?

Red pens, the editor's stock-in-trade

Where images are the primary sources, where does text fit in? Should museums uphold editorial standards, or go with the Web 2.0 flow? More»

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Posted in Ancient World, Antiquities, Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Voices

Getty Voices: Sicilian Journeys

Sicily: Art and Invention between Greece and Rome at the Getty Villa
Artwork reproduced by permission of the Regione Siciliana, Assessorato dei Beni Culturali e dell'Identità Siciliana. Dipartimento dei Beni Culturali e dell'Identità Siciliana

A charioteer? A dancer? The Mozia Youth, aguably one of the world’s most breathtaking ancient sculptures, is both mysterious and beautiful. More»

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Posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, J. Paul Getty Museum, Voices

Getty Voices: What #isamuseum?

Screen Shot 2013-06-10 at 8.22.53 AM

“The project emerged through extended dialogue with members of the Getty Museum’s Education Department, and it was certainly a collaboration.” More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Getty Conservation Institute, Voices

Getty Voices: The Stones of Rome

Detail of a stone fountain in Rome, Italy, showing damage caused by weathering
Rome is defined by its beautiful stone buildings, bridges, and sculptures. But stone isn't eternal, even in the Eternal City. Photo: Scott S. Warren

Conservators from around the world have gathered in Rome to learn techniques for preserving stone artworks and monuments. More»

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      All Hail Tiberius, Least Media-Savvy of the Roman Emperors

      Tiberius was proclaimed Roman emperor on September 17 in AD 14, exactly 2,000 years ago.

      He was also a bit wacko. “He was the least media-savvy emperor you could imagine,” says curator David Saunders, who has been in charge of this bronze portrait of Tiberius which leaves us on September 22. He point to this description found in the writings of Cassius Dio:

      Tiberius was a patrician of good education, but he had a most peculiar nature. He never let what he desired appear in his conversation, and what he said he wanted he usually did not desire at all. On the contrary, his words indicated the exact opposite of his real purpose; he denied all interest in what he longed for, and urged the claims of what he hated. He would exhibit anger over matters that were far from arousing his wrath, and make a show of affability where he was most vexed…In short, he thought it bad policy for the sovereign to reveal his thoughts; this was often the cause, he said, of great failures, whereas by the opposite course, far more and greater successes were attained.

      Moreover, David tells us, “Tiberius’s accession itself was a farrago: Tiberius sort-of feigning reluctance, the Senate bullying him, he being all, ‘Well, if-I-have-to,’ and in the end—according to Suetonius—saying he’ll do it as long as he can retire.”

      Suetonius is full of great, albeit spurious, anecdotes about poor old Tiberius, David reports. “When someone addressed him as ‘My Lord,’ it is said, Tiberius gave warning that no such insult should ever again be thrown at him.”

      Happy accession, My Lord!

      Portrait Head of Tiberius (“The Lansdowne Tiberius”), early 1st century A.D., Roman. The J. Paul Getty Museum

      Statue of Tiberius (detail), Roman, A.D. 37, Soprintendenza Speciale per i Beni Archeologici di Napoli e Pompei – Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Napoli, Laboratorio di Conservazione e Restauro. Currently on view at the Getty Villa following conservation and study.

      09/17/14

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