horticulture

Posted in Behind the Scenes, Gardens and Architecture

A Tree Gets Its Wings

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As a new tree reaches the end of its life, a new sun garden is born. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Center

Never-Ending Summer in the Central Garden

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Long live summer. More»

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Posted in Gardens and Architecture, Getty Center

Sniff Your Way through the Getty Gardens

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A smell tour of the Getty Center’s flora. More»

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Posted in Gardens and Architecture

September in the Central Garden

Echinacea in the Central Garden at the Getty Center, September 2013

Flowers and foliage give off a feverish display as summer winds, ever so slowly, to a close. More»

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Posted in Art, Gardens and Architecture

Edible Gardening in the Renaissance

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What grew in the Renaissance garden? Many familiar favorites, from cabbage to strawberries. More»

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Posted in Gardens and Architecture, Getty Center

Hi! I’m an L.A. Native.

Cream cups (Platystemon californicus)

They say L.A. has no center; they say it’s a desert. We native Angelenos know that’s not true—and not just when it comes to architecture, either. More»

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Posted in Gardens and Architecture

For California Gardeners, Winter Is the New Summer

European honeybee on tidy tips in the Central Garden

Winter, the sere season? Not in California, where the cool months are our lushest, our most verdant of all. More»

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Posted in Gardens and Architecture, Getty Center

The Moment of Alliums

Coming this summer: Look for sculptural alliums holding their own against the dramatic architecture of the Getty Center
Coming this summer: Look for sculptural alliums holding their own against the dramatic architecture of the Getty Center

It is the week of return—of the vernal equinox, and of the shooting stars—the blue blue-violet alliums in Robert Irwin’s Central Garden at the Getty Center. We’ve been waiting. In late-ish February, green shoots began rocketing from the rich dark… More»

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Posted in Gardens and Architecture, Getty Center

Winter in the Central Garden

Foliage of Eschscholzia california in the rain in the Central Garden at the Getty Center

The Getty’s outdoor spaces are never more beautiful than in the colder months. More»

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Posted in Gardens and Architecture, Getty Center

You Asked, We Answered: The Mystery Plant Is…

Spanish flag in the Central Garden at the Getty Center - close-up of foliage

“What’s that?” is a common question in the Central Garden, a place full of exotic and curious plants. “James Cameron must have come here when he was dreaming up Avatar,” I recently overheard a visitor say while pointing to some… More»

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      #ProvenancePeek: June 30

      Every art object has a story—not only of how it was made, but of how it changed hands over time until it found its current home. That story is provenance.

      This portrait of actress Antonia Zárate by Goya is now part of the collection of the National Gallery of Ireland. The records of famed art dealer M. Knoedler & Co. at the Getty Research Institute reveal its recent provenance: the painting was sold by Knoedler on June 30, 1910, to financier Otto Beit. Part of his collection, including this painting, was later donated to the National Gallery of Ireland in Dublin. To this day the Gallery showcases some of its greatest masterpieces in the Beit Wing. This spread from a digitized Knoedler stock book records the transaction (second entry from top).

      M. Knoedler was one of the most influential dealers in the history of art. He sold European paintings to collectors (such as Henry Clay Frick, the Vanderbilts, and Andrew Mellon) whose collections formed the genesis of great museums such as the National Gallery of Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Frick Collection, the Huntington, and more. Knoedler’s stock books have recently been digitized and transformed into a searchable database, which anyone can query for free.

      Portrait of Doña Antonia Zárate, ca. 1805–06, José de Goya y Lucientes. Beit Collection, National Gallery of Ireland. Image courtesy of the National Gallery of Ireland.

      _______

      #ProvenancePeek is a monthly series by research assistant Kelly Davis peeking into #onthisday provenance finds from the M. Knoedler & Co. archives at the Getty Research Institute.

      06/30/15

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